Continuously surrounded by art, I write about my experiences and their influences on my artistic practices. I am a starving artist that spends every minute I can being exposed to as many types of art as possible.

Posts tagged “Portraits

The Houston Artcrawl

This past weekend I headed to Houston to do more studio tours.  This is only my 2nd time going to the Artcrawl, but I really enjoyed it last year, so my friend and I decided to head north.  There are almost 200 artists participating, but this event is very different from the Austin studio tours.  The biggest difference is that the Artcrawl only takes place in one day, where as the Austin tours are over two weekends.  Last year I was a little disappointed in having such a short time to explore so many artists and spaces, but this year I was much more prepared.  The fact that all of these artists are all in only about nine spaces really helped, other studio tours are much more spread out with less artists in more locations.  In Houston, there seems to be a preference for renting studio spaces in large warehouses, or maybe that is just what is primarily available.  While it is always great to work around or be associated with other artists, renting a studio with so many other people usually means there is a lot more bad art than good.  But I will continue to look for artists that I want to work with, even though most of the time it does mean sifting through a lot of other art I’m not interested in.  That’s ok.  I try to prepare as much as I can by going through the artist list first.  I still need to see what people are working on, what materials are used, topics being discuss, and how the work is presented.  I always have a lot to learn from other artists. Meeting with another friend in Houston,  the three of us begin the Artcrawl at Mother Dog Studios, a huge Kelly Alisonwarehouse comprised of easily over fifty artists.  Immediately walking in, there is a huge wall filled with the work of Kelly Alison.  She is an artist I had previously worked with in Unconscious Desires, an exhibit I curated in 2009.  Her colorful depictions of birds are engaging.  The works exhibited here are all oil on paper, each measuring 28″ x 22″.  There is always so much going on in her imagery, it’s hard not to get pulled in.  These pieces are part of a series Tweet, 2011, in which Alison completed a piece every day for 365 days.  On display she has 24 out of the 365 pieces.  Based on current world events, she presents serious topics in her distinct style, discussing everything from the Japanese nuclear meltdown, local homelessness, to the economy.  The work was then tweeted, resulting in this body of work being recognized and published in various sources.  A couple have already sold today, which is always great during studio tours.  However, she is not here.  Since I have already gone through the artist list, I know she will be at her studio at Box 13.  It is great to be able to view artists’ work through several different series, especially when it continues to evolve into new concepts. Walking into the studio of Katie Wynne, it is filled with assemblage type sculptures.Katie Wynne, Untitled (Satin)  Random items put together,  initially, I’m not sure what to make of them.  Then I see this beautiful piece of satin on the ground.  It is slowly moving, very sensually, into itself.  It is so simple, composed of two items, the satin and a motor in the middle creating the movement.  She has a fantastic video of Untitled (Satin) on her website.  I also find a massager with knitted covers over the moving parts.  Again, creating a mesmerizing movement that draws me in.  Both of these pieces are composed of a tactile element using a specific type of material and movement.  Meeting Wynne, I discover these more sensual pieces are relatively new, compared to her other works.  I discuss Seven Minutes in Heaven (SMIH) with her, these two particular pieces would fit well in the rooms of the Fox Motel.  She seems interested and I get her business card.  I would love to have her in the show. John RunnelsThis is the second year in a row I have been to the studio of John Runnels and he is not there.  His vulgar work using the word fuck in various media is very amusing.  Creating these works with materials such as dictionaries, letterman jacket letters, money, and other assorted items, I like the variation in media used.  He has another series of work on display as well, vintage looking nude photos that are displayed in oven doors.  I prefer the Fuck Series much more.  Literal and in your face, I think that is what I enjoy about these pieces.  I would really like to talk to him about SMIH, I knew that as soon as I saw his work last year.  Apparently, he is part of the duo that started the Houston Artcrawl.  I’m sure he must be very busy.  Unfortunately, I can find no business cards either.  Well, I know where to find him. Clint Stone is another elusive artist I have yet to meet.  His landscapes have this moody atmosphere that attract me, revealing another reality, a more emotive view of what is there.  Finding artists that create something deeper than what is on Clint Stonethe surface is always the goal.  When I am trying to create a show, my focus is to present art that is not homogeneous.  Maybe I am specifically taking on this challenge by curating shows that have strong connotations already associated with them.  Currently, the group exhibitions I have been trying to put together include landscape, portraiture, and women and fabric.  Those are very traditional topics that I hope to change expectations of.  Ana Fernandez is another artist I would love to include in the landscape exhibit.  I have written about her large scale oil paintings of homes reflecting the culture of San Antonio, when she exhibited in Austin, at Women and Their Work and also when she gave a lecture of her work in San Antonio, at the McNay Art Museum. Ken FrederickThe photography of Ken Frederick also catches my attention.  His portraits of  mannequins are done in a way that gives these lifeless bodies a persona.  Staring at the pieces, I feel like it is a portrait of an actual person.  Unfortunately, it is a little difficult to get a good photo, the frames are highly reflective.  But I think even in this photo there is a sense of emotion.  I get to speak with the artist for a little bit about this, discussing how much life I get from these images.  This definitely works into my theme of untraditional portraiture.  Finding artists with a unique perspective on such a traditional style with a rich history is going to take a while, but will be worth the effort. Kelly AlisonBox 13 is a gallery that also houses studios.  I’ve never made it out here before, so I’m glad I was able to check it out.  This is where Kelly Alison has her studio.  It is great to talk to her.  She shows me her current work, says she would love to show in San Antonio and would be happy to work with me again.  That is always the highest compliment – when someone will return to work with you.  She is an accomplished artist, exhibiting as far as in China and Peru, as well as extensively in Houston, including two permanent public art pieces.  Unfortunately, I am not working specifically on anything that her work would fit into, but I am always coming up with new shows, so I make sure I have her updated contact information.  Alison was in the first show I ever worked on as curator with out of town artists.  It would be great to work with her again.  Maybe I can work on getting her a solo show in San Antonio. Another artist I meet at Box 13 is Elaine Bradford.  Her studio is brimming with transformed taxidermied animals that vary in size from birds and Elaine Bradfordducks to sheep.   Bradford gives them new perspective, with a crocheted skin around the figures, creating a colorful outer layer.  Completely concealing the original figure, the only revealed parts are the eyes of the animal.  Bradford even constructs her own species of animals, complete with their own legends.  There is a great description of these on her website, from her exhibit The Museum of Unnatural History.  This includes a two headed sheep and another species that fuse their tales in a mating ritual when they have found their partner with the same pattern.  While presenting those animals in a traditional setting of taxidermy, as you can see in this photo, other animals are exhibited in new and unusual ways, continuing to surprise in the display, as well as what constitutes as an “animal”, as she merges natural elements with the figures.  Women and fabric?  Maybe another artist that pushes the boundaries and expectations of a traditional medium that I could work with in the future. I have to admit I am pleasantly surprised with the variation of media I found being presented in this Artcrawl.  While I found traditional media such as painting, drawing, sculpture, and photography being used, that was the extend of what was predictable.  Their concepts pushed the media and what it means.  Assemblage and crochet were additional methods I saw used to convey their ideas in interesting and engaging ways.  This was a great studio tour.  If I can find one artist to work with, I consider that a successful studio tour.  But I may have found quite a number of different artists for several different projects.  These are the things I get really excited about.

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Lucian Freud

Lucian FruedThere is a huge Lucian Freud exhibit at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.  Over ninety pieces are included in this exhibit.  It is also the only US stop for this show that was put together by the National Portrait Gallery London.  A large number of these pieces were painted in his studio, portraying life – the studio as the background with many subjects vulnerable, yet comfortable, posing nude, seeming to just be hanging out.  There are so many things to take in when looking at his work, composed largely of portraits and nudes.  The scale is immense, making these figures larger than life.  Painting his subjects as they “posed” for him, full of emotion and intensity. The permanent collection at the Modern is always fantastic to wander through.  There is a wonderful selection of Modern and Contemporary art, including Joseph Cornell, Richard Hamilton, Robert Rauschenberg, Robert Motherwell, and some huge pieces by Anselm Kiefer.  The Greeting, 1995, by video artist Bill Viola is a provocative piece to watch.  The video is of two women talking, when a third woman walks up and joins the conversation.  While this is an ordinary occurrence, Viola captures human emotion as he plays the interaction in slow motion.  This changes the entire way this encounter is viewed.  SFMOMA has a great video of Viola discussing this piece, and how the composition of the figures are based on an image of The Visitation.  This makes me think of Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests.  He would film people for the length of the film, a couple of minutes, but would slow it down and extend it to four minutes.  Warhol felt a person either had a presence or they didn’t.  Warhol was also interested in capturing real life and human emotions, as in his early art films Sleep, Eat, and Blow.  I was fortunate enough to see several of the screen tests played at the McNay, when they exhibited Andy Warhol: Fame and Misfortune. The Greeting, Bill Viola Another highlight in the collection is the Minimal art.  This particular type of art is clean and simplistic.  It is interesting that next month I will be heading to Marfa, Texas for my annual pilgrimage to Chinati, and here in Fort Worth many of the artists I will see there are on display, such as Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, and Carl Andre.  This large piece by Judd is from the floor to the ceiling.  Even in this image, you can begin to see how the translucent plastic or glass material bathes the work in a soft haze of orange, extending from the piece to the surrounding environment. Donald Judd

 However, I do prefer to view these artists in the setting that Chinati presents.  One or two pieces from an artist doesn’t seem like enough.  Even though that is primarily how art is viewed.  Well, that’s not entirely true, maybe just regarding permanent collections.  I make a huge effort to see an artist’s solo exhibitions.  It is important for me to see a large body of work from the artist or experience several series, such as in a major exhibition or retrospective.   Since viewing the huge installations that are presented in Marfa, I think I am spoiled.  Maybe Judd was onto something.  I think I do prefer his isolated, large permanent exhibits of an artist’s  work.  In that context, I can get an idea of what they are trying to convey through their work.  If you are drawn to a particular artist, it is also logical to want to see more.  Installations on such a large scale are also an experience in itself.  That cannot be expressed in one or two pieces.

Minimalist Art

Richard Serra also has a small piece, however, his amazing work here is a massive outdoor sculpture.  Rusting metal overtakes several stories, towering over you.  As with many of Serra’s outdoor sculptures, Richard SerraI was able to walk around and inside.  With an opening at the top, the light shined in.  The size, material, and tall shape also made the piece bounce echoes of any noise or yelling from inside.  That was an interesting experience.  I have always found it interesting that Serra is one if the few artists that has had his work rejected by the public.  Having to walk around the large structure in a plaza proved too much for some New Yorkers to appreciate, and Tiled Arc was dismantled, apparently still sitting in a warehouse.  Another public work by Serra that has caused some controversy is the outdoor piece, Shift, located in Canada.  Although the issues surrounding that piece have to do with land rights being sold, with the new owners trying to remove the work. Richard SerraThe highlight, however, may be the actual building itself.  Built fairly recently in 2002, it was designed by Japanese architect, Tadao Ando.  This modern building is a brilliant extension of the art collection within.  The forty foot glass windows allow an incredible natural light to enter, while outside it reflects the serene pond, outdoor sculptures, and an amazing view of downtown Fort Worth.  With plenty of space to walk around,  it is easy to enjoy the view.  The unique design places the building within the 1.5 acre pond, the water coming right up to the large glass panes, creating the illusion that the building is effortlessly floating. The Modern, Fort Worth


West Austin Studio Tours

As an artist and curator, I am always searching for new artists to work with.  I have attended the East Austin Studio Tours for a few years, but for the first time, they are hosting the West Austin Studio Tours.  Only about an hour drive from San Antonio, I will always try to take advantage of an opportunity to meet a lot of artists and see their work all at once.  Huge open studios like these often have over one hundred artists participating.  Another perfect day for exploring art! My first stop is to see Ana Fernandez at Women and Their Work.  Real Estate and Other Fictions, is a show of her large scale paintings.  Fernandez is a native Texan from Corpus Christi, currently living and working in San Antonio.  Depicting common San Antonio scenes, one starts to realize it may not be so common after all.  It is a unique city that creates its own culture, with a strong past.

Ana Fernandez

Ana Fernandez

While being a top ten city in the country for population, it often feels much smaller, with all its eccentricities.  Fernandez captures these moments, reminding me these scenes probably only exist here.  She was able to make it up to Austin for the open studio, and besides her paintings, she was running her Botanica.  Selling powders and potions to ward off controlling people and more modern bruharia to have someone unblock you on facebook, I love Fernandez’s sense of humor and how she embraces the culture I grew up in and sometimes take for granted.  While botanicas don’t seem to be around anymore, they still exist, low key and hidden in the neighborhoods, much like the scenes she finds dispersed throughout the city.  Fernandez is giving these beliefs a make over, refusing to let old traditions die.  Looking at her paintings is like driving around in the neighborhood.  Even if you haven’t seen the exact house she has decided to paint, you know you’ve still seen this house, know these people.  Some of them are in my family.  Women and Their Work was a fantastic, huge space.  It was a great location to showcase such large paintings.  They also had a fantastic gallery shop with interesting books and art.  

nothing (Adreon Henry), 2012
Austin, Texas
Jessica Garcia

One of the best studios visited belonged to Adreon Henry and Jennifer Bradley.  Both living quarters and art studio for the couple, it was quintessential Austin.  Their unique space had a living room floor covered in laminated book pages, while art, books, and collectibles were displayed everywhere.  The printing equipment was an impressive set up in the side room.  Henry was an interesting guy, into experimental music, books, and seriously making art.  His house was a bed of creativity and inspiration.  A drink was offered as we talk about the Bruce Haack vinyl playing.  We discussed putting on shows in alternative locations.  He had held one in an abandoned convenience store and I talked about Seven Minutes in Heaven at the Fox Motel.  Artists are the most interesting people.  Henry worked in many types of media, including painting, drawing, music, and mixed media.  His sense of humor comes out as he draws alien figures on found art.

Adreon Henry

There were a number of portrait painters that I was surprised drew me in.  I felt these artists took something as traditional as a portrait and kept it

Karen Offutt

interesting, which is often hard to do.  I love the moments that Karen Offutt chose to depict, one invading a private moment as this girl sneaks some food while she cooks.  The expressive look on her

H. Chase Seal

face as she is caught is what makes this painting stand out for me.  Painting everyday scenes of everyday people can be a tiresome subject if there is not some kind of excitement behind it.  I came upon H. Chase Seal’s work by accident.  I don’t believe it was listed on the tour, running into it as I stopped in an interesting looking store.  The large, closely cropped portraits drew my attention.  Also included was a pastel drawing I liked.  While much more minimal in medium, it was just as expressive. My head was already starting to curate, a contemporary portrait show would be nice.  Portraits can often be over looked as a contemporary subject matter, but these artists were proving otherwise.  I always enjoy seeing artists who love what they do.  That should always come across clearly in their work. But the most fun and interactive piece was by far the Quick Draw Photo Booth by Aron Taylor at Big Medium.  Dealing again in portraiture, this was definitely a new concept.  Just a loud voice coming from a speaker on this home made photo booth was inviting you in for a fun time.  Not knowing what to expect, my friend and I decided to participate.  I didn’t realize until after I was in the booth, that we were not alone.  Hidden behind the camera wall, we could not see the artist as he directed our “photo shoot”.  A cowboy with a Texas draw talked to us the entire time, making this such an engaging experience.  This guy was hilarious!  Combining art and comedy, photography and drawing, this was quite a memorable booth.  Everyone’s experience was completely unique, as each participant was given different instructions.

Entering the unknown

For our shoot, we were playing the role of celebrities, expressing moments with paparazzi hounding us, and ending with the death of the celebrity.

Our final photo

I laughed the entire time and enjoyed that this was something I had never experienced before.  Still not knowing what to expect, he told us it took about three minutes to develop the photos and didn’t want to burn himself with chemicals.  We continued to walk around the gallery space until he loudly announced they were done.  This original drawing on the right is what the photo booth spit out, in traditional fashion.  If I ever curate this portrait exhibit, I would love to include Taylor.  Someone like this definitely shakes up the typical perceived notion of portraiture. On my way out of Austin, I made a final stop at Art on 5th, to see the art work of Dr. Suess.  While I have known this gallery has been representing his work for a while, this was the first time I ever paid a visit.  I have always liked his art and have a book, The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss,  that included images of most of the work on display.  He has always been a

Dr. Seuss

playful illustrator and I find his other works just as whimsical.  Unmistakably his work, these are entirely new worlds Seuss has created, often exposing a much darker side.  There are no rhymes to happily bring a conclusion to these works.  Yet, these creatures live in this colorful, fantastic existence.  Dr. Seuss will always be a childhood favorite of most people.  It’s great to connect with his “secret” art work, not intended for children’s books.  It is always a pleasure to lose yourself in these exotic places that only exist in the mind of Dr. Seuss.

Dr. Seuss

Debbie Mosely

Amid the many pieces from Dr. Seuss, other artists are represented by Art on 5th.  One landscape painter in particular caught my attention, Debbie Mosely.  I was drawn to the atmospheric mood she was creating with her paint brush and drips.  Looking at her pieces, I felt that I had often been there, in that desolate place, even if just in my mind. The West Austin Studio Tours were a fantastic experience.  A little different from East Austin with more gallery spaces, but the creativity continues to flow on the other side of IH-35.  Austin is greatly known for their music scene, but this weekend I got to take a closer look at the expanding art community and it was a great experience I hope I get to enjoy again.  I am already waiting for the East Austin Studio Tours in November.