Continuously surrounded by art, I write about my experiences and their influences on my artistic practices. I am a starving artist that spends every minute I can being exposed to as many types of art as possible.

Posts tagged “Light

James Turrell lights up Houston

Since I really enjoy art using light, of course I went to see the work of James Turrell as part of a unique retrospective that is consecutively taking place in three different locations.  The largest installation is at the Guggenheim in New York.  I also read an article about the installations at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA).  Much closer to home, I went to the part taking place at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH).  As the press was coming out, I kept reading about the installations at the Guggenheim and LACMA, but nothing about Houston.  The star piece of the entire exhibition is the light piece that takes over the main rotunda at the Guggenheim.  The images of it look amazing, and I know photos never give light installations justice.  Since I couldn’t find much on Houston, I really didn’t know what to expect.  I greatly admire and draw inspiration from experiencing contemporary art.  The concepts and contemplation that it takes to create some of these pieces amazes me.  Contemporary art fascinates me because it challenges preconceived notions in an intellectual way.  I enjoy thinking about an art piece and seeing an idea in a new way.  Large installations, light pieces, and sculptures are some of my favorite medias to experience.  Another light artist I have been following is Dan Flavin.  I have seen some of his large installations in Marfa and in Houston.

The Light Inside

I have always been amazed at the permanent installation there by Turrell, The Light Inside, 1999, which I briefly wrote about when I was at the MFAH last, in March.  This piece takes over a long underground hallway connecting two buildings.  The tunnel is composed of a walkway maybe just a foot off the ground.  On either side of the walkway is a few feet to the wall, in a light wash of The Light Inside, 1999color.  However,  the way the  light is presented makes it seem endless, like an abyss.  The more you focus on the environment, the more the illusion takes over.  I get a little distorted, it feels like I would fall forever.  Art21 did a great interview with Turrell that focuses on The Light Inside in Houston and the Roden Crater in Flagstaff, Arizona.  The volcano has been his most ambitious project that he has been working on since the 70’s.

Hands down, my favorite installation here is the Ganzfeld, the only piece in this exhibit that you can actually walk into.  No photos, of course.  It is meant to simulate a white out, something that occurs during blizzard, where there is no perception of the space. Experiencing this condition for an extended amount of time has been known to cause hallucinations.  This was created with curved walls, making the room seem endless.  There are people inside to keep you from going over the “edge”.  As with the other pieces, the lights are completely hidden, just casting a glow of slowly changing colors.  LACMA has a Perceptual Cell that costs an additional $45 entry fee and requires a waiver be signed before entering.  That specific piece really may cause hallucinations, being in an isolated cell, just the experience of light.

What is amazing about experiencing work by Turrell is the illusion that is created in the space.  He creates an environment, many of his pieces require their own room.  Some pieces seemed to occupy both negative and positive space at the same time.  This was particularly true of the wall cut outs.  The light seemed to be cubes floating in the air, or breaking up the floor.   The entire time seeming to fluctuate between a physical object in front of you, and a recessed object within the wall.

Going a few blocks away from the MFAH, we walk onto the Rice University Campus.  They have an outdoor permanent installation, Twilight Epiphany, 2012, that sits upon aTurrell at Rice hill.  However, it is actually a man made area, the grass is actually camouflaging the interior seating for the piece.  There are two levels to sit on.  The bottom space is made of marble seating, with tall slanted backs, on the inside of the cube like installation.  The upstairs has the same type of seating but made of concrete, also slanted for you to be at an angle looking upwards.  The upstairs chairs are on the outside of the open cube, so both levels can view above.  The entire structure is covered by a flat roof, with a cut out facing the sky.  This is where the art takes place.  Even before the sunset show began, you can begin to see how the piece subtly changes, with the use of both natural and artificial light.  I have seen the sunset James Turrell at Ricemany times, sometimes able to stop and view this beautiful natural occurrence.  But this particular piece utilizes color theory to create or isolate colors.  A forty minute light “show” unfolds as the sun sets.  The staff requests silence and no photos.  As in the main exhibit, outside light will affect the piece.  It was a very meditative experience.  The sky changed through many different colors – light blue, teal, gray, black, a brilliant colbalt blue.  While the light is progressively getting darker, Turrell then uses the artificial lights projecting onto the roof, bringing the colors from light to dark, and back to light again.  It was a very interesting experience and experiment.  This show also takes place at sunrise.  I think I will have to experience that as well, at some point.

James Turrell at RiceJames Turrell at Rice

A statement was made by the Guggenheim stating the large installation piece in the Rotunda is not a Skyspace, as at Rice.  The specific difference is a Skyspace has an opening to the outside, while the Guggenheim’s opening is covered in glass.

Leaving Houston, in the paper was a story about a woman in Florida that realized she had a Turrell in her home and had been using it for storage.  Disappointing, the new owner is trying to sell the piece.  The bottom of the article has a nice slide show of a few Turrell pieces.

Yes, I am currently dreaming of seeing the Guggenheim exhibit.  Unfortunately, there is no way I could make that happen by the closing September 25.  It would be amazing if I could make a trip for my birthday on September 23….but that will not happen with my current work schedule and financial situation.  However, the show in Los Angeles runs through April 6, 2014.  There is a possibility I could make it there before the closing.  And save an additional $45 for the Perception Cell.  Yes, I would.  I already would like to visit this exhibit at the MFAH again before it comes down.  I will definitely also be revisiting Twilight Epiphany at Rice, as it is a permanent installation.  This exhibit really expanded my mind.  The possibilities of what a media like light can create is endless and ever changing.  Perceptions of color, space, and what is tangible where all pushed and questioned.  I find that exhilarating and the entire reason why I continue to seek new experiences with art.  Of course, my pictures do not do this exhibit justice.  It is something to experience in person.

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Neon by Todd Sanders

A stop in Austin led me to Roadhouse Relics.  Passing by on the way to End of an Ear, the neon lights in the window called to me.  I always enjoy experiencing light installations or how lighting can be used to change the way a piece is viewed.  However, these pieces are different, vintage signs updated with neon mixed in with original signs referencing pop culture.  The work is fun and whimsical, I would love to have one of these pieces.  The front is the gallery houses the work of Todd Sanders, the back and outside of the building house his studio.  Looking out the window, there are many more vintage signs waiting to be revived back to life with light. Original Art except this crappy sign   Legs, Todd Sanders   Red Top, Todd Sanders   Dollar Sign   WTF, Todd Sanders


Seeking Refuge: Twombly, Flavin, and Picasso

The stress of Contemporary Art Month has been creeping up on me.  It has been a fantastic, crazy, last few weeks.  Beginning with a successful Seven Minutes in Heaven 2013 and continuing with a great inaugural opening of PS102, a new gallery space located inside a business, where I am now curating exhibitions monthly.  In between all of this, I have been working on some new work for my open studio tour coming up in a few days, as well as slowly thinking of what I want to exhibit for another upcoming show I will be having in July.  If I can get my work together.  There is always something to work on, always something to think about.  Since March is Contemporary Art Month, it has been my busiest time of the year for the last couple of years.  But this year, I have never taken on this many projects.  It’s enough to drive a girl mad. Beautiful day in Houston!Despite the fact that I have a huge load of work, I decide to get out of town.  There’s a lot on my mind and I feel like I need a change of scenery.  I haven’t left town for no reason in quite a while.  Well, isn’t my sanity the best reason?  Looking up something to do, there is a Picasso exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston (MFAH) that looks amazing.  Surprisingly, there is a second major exhibit touring there as well, Portraits of Spain: Masterpieces from the Prado, that will be closing soon.  These exhibits are normally $20 each to get into, but I find on one particular night this week, they are letting you in for $10 FOR BOTH.  I think I have found a place to escape and clear my brain from the now.  Luckily, my friend in Houston takes me in, so that is where I head, on the Megabus. The first few hours in town are spent by myself.  This is refreshing and fantastic.  I ignore my email, facebook, and texts, to just breathe for a while.  I decide to just stroll around downtown.   I’ve mentioned how I love the city.  Yes, there is a lot going on around me, but it feels much different when it’s not me rushing around.  I am the one in slow motion as everything is running around me.  People watching, architecture, just observing life.  As usual, I see art everywhere, as I think of Richard Estes, staring at these huge store windows.  While I have always loved and photographed reflections, Estes gave me an appreciation for layered realities.

IMG_8166

I hop on a bus to the Menil.  Instead of heading straight inside, I turn to go to the little park there. This new route took me on a side of the Menil that I had never noticed before.  Enjoying the outdoor sculptures is something I don’t always take advantage of when I am here.    There are three negative sculptures by Michael Heizer on the lawn of the museum, created from 1968-1972.  Known for creating land art, these sculptures are small scale replicas of three pieces from his “Nine Nevada Depressions” series of work, made in 1967.  These pieces laid the groundwork for one of his major works, Double Negative, created in 1969-70.  Studying DN in school, the scale of land art fascinates me.  The design of Rift reminded me of the Jewish Museum in Berlin, designed by Daniel Libeskind.   It is such a beautiful day, just relaxing under a tree is exactly what I needed.  I sketched a little and worked on some of my titles for my current pieces, but nothing pressing, nothing that had to be done now.  Just thinking and brainstorming.  The stress was beginning to melt away. IMG_8162 Cy TwomblyWhen I finally got up (probably after about an hour), I decided to head to the Cy Twombly Gallery.  The Menil is fantastic, the way it has several additional buildings in the immediate area, dedicated to a particular artist or specific type of art.  I will openly admit I used to never appreciate Twombly.  While not being exposed to many images of his work in school, I had still seen several of his pieces in Cy Twomblydifferent museums, but only one or two together.  They never really said anything to me, there was not enough of a discussion.  Then I went to the Cy Twombly Gallery in Houston for the first time.  Getting to see so many different bodies of his work let me appreciate the gestures and lines, an important element of many of his works.  One of my favorite series here is Untitled (A Painting in Nine Parts), 1988.  The deep, gestural greens seem to lead into the abyss.  These pieces are full of emotion and gesture.  Using a limited color pallet, the work is expressive of something much deeper.  Staring into them, I feel a sadness, as if I were Ophelia, letting the weight of everything pull me down.  The heaviness keeps me exploring further.  Even in this series, Twombly adds lines in the form of text,  a poem to Rilke, enforcing the mood he has created in this room, with this painting, in nine parts.

(Ponds) to Rilke

and in the ponds

broken off from the sky

my feeling sinks

as if standing on

fishes

For the first time, I fall in love with a new series of Twombly’s work, Analysis of the Rose as Sentimental Despair, a set of five paintings, 1985.  Viewing them before, I apparently never appreciated the depth these paintings offer.  While these large pieces are composed on white backgrounds, the feelings of despair, continue to hang in the air in this room also.  This is an interesting combination using this color.  White normally represent things such as youth, purity, and innocence, yet here is in juxtaposition with mature perceptions.   The emotional gestures in a seemingly chaotic mess exude complicated passions.  The “rose” seems to display a bleeding heart – messy, dripping, and coming out of the canvas.  Amid the abstract imagery, the pieces also incorporate text, forming characteristic scribbles.  It’s interesting when Twombly uses “legible” text, he creates a distinction from the imagery.  Where as in many of his most recognizable works, the scribbles are the work, presented as indecipherable and repetitive gestures.  In this instant,  quotes from Rilke, Rumi, and Giacomo Leopardi are crammed into a compartmental space above the imagery, shaping the panel. Each series I encounter offers more to the conversation with Twombly.  As each room houses a different body of work, more of his thoughts and gestures are revealed.  Cy Twombly, Thicket (Juniper Island), 1992Extending past the canvas, his work also includes sculptural pieces.  While not a huge fan of his sculptural work, there has always been one piece in particular that has always drawn me in, Thicket (Jupiter Island), 1992.  Made of wood, plastic leaves, plaster, and paint, the media differs greatly from his more characteristic work.  I always return to this piece.  Something about the way the plant looks like it’s suffocating, drowning in the paint, fascinates me.  It is completely covered, yet the plant doesn’t seem weighed down, it is still springing up.  Any life is blocked by the plaster, coming or going, yet it has this tenacity, aiding it’s survival.  Previously, I discussed an exhibit of huge still life photography by David LaChapelle, referring to a particular piece as “the Suffocating Bouquet”.  In both pieces, the “life” is restrained by an outside force.  But I never get the sense of something being dead, the life has not been removed, somehow these piece are still breathing.  They are both the color white, the color of life.  It is captivating to look at. Twombly’s work culminates in Untitled (Say Goodbye Catullus, to the Shores of Asia Minor), 1994.  This enormous triptych takes up an entire room, at 53′ wide and 13′ high, showcasing the range of mark making he utilized throughout his many bodies of work.  This particular piece is both minimal and yet very expressive at the same time.  Completed over a span of twenty years, this is the full discussion Twombly wanted to exhibit.  While the most complete, this may be the piece I discuss the least.  It is something to be viewed and contemplated in person.  See this piece after you have viewed the rest of the gallery and don’t underestimate it.  There is a bench.  Just sit down for a while. CyTwombly Cy Twombly detail Untitled (Say Goodbye Catullus, to the Shores of Asia Minor), 1994, Detail In an entirely separate building a few block away is Dan Flavin.  Richmond Hall is yet another building exclusive to one artist, by the Menil.  Flavin is one of my favorite artists that works with light and this is one of my favorite pieces.  I have been fortunate enough to see quite a few of his works, such as in New York, Berlin, and Munich.  But my other favorite Flavin installation I have written about is in Marfa, Texas, at Chinati.  His individual pieces don’t compare to the way the light works together when combined to create these massive works.  Using a characteristic limited color pallet, this piece incorporates pink, yellow, green, and blue, and uses one additional color I have never seen utilized in another work of his, purple, in the form of a fluorescent light splitting down the middle of the entire length of the piece, anchoring them together.  The lights reflect on the floor, extending the work from the walls into the space.  While there are the physical components of a light piece, it is about what is radiating and how it works with the environment it’s in, that is the most interesting part of experiencing light pieces.  It is about the space, a much different viewing experience than looking at a two dimensional piece of art. Dan Flavin When I first walk in, there is actually a contemporary dance troupe performing amid the installation.  Their body movements were mesmerizing, I kept thinking how exceptional  it is to be able to perform in the midst of such an amazing Dan Flavin Detailenvironment.  The piece highlighted motion and gestures using only their bodies, in a space where the art was exuding from the walls.  This was indeed a unique experience.  The performance was by the MFAH Core Residency Program at the Glassell School of Art and I talk to the choreographer.  I tell her about Luminaria, a huge city art event in San Antonio that is about light, but encompasses all arts, including literature, performance, and dance.  I have worked with Luminaria, on a couple of occasions,  most recently this year as Site Manager for a fringe location.  They give out grants to perform.  I write down the info for her and she gives me her card.  It really was a special piece, I would love to see it travel.  Isn’t that what I do as a curator?  Make sure art is seen?  While not curating now, I have to share info with this spectacular program. IMG_8234 This signified the end of my introspective time alone, this is where my friend met me.  After dinner, we head to the MFAH.  The special entrance doesn’t start for another hour, so we decide to enjoy the permanent collection, it is free today.  The Abstract Impulse: Selections from the Modern and Contemporary Collections is one of the exhibits they have out.  A large imposing Soundsuit, 2011, by Nick Cave towers over you at the entrance.  Cave makes these suits out of different materials, this one composed of various rugs. The feet are the only reference to a person, yet there is a major presence as you walk around the piece.   The suits are meant to be worn and performed in.  He will be performing in Grand Central Terminal in a few days.  I was very disappointed that I missed his exhibit of these suits at the Austin Museum of Art (AMoA) last year, I heard that was an amazing show.  Another exceptional piece is Grupo Mondongo, Calaveras 4Calavera 4, created by Grupo Mondongo, an Argentinian Collective of three artists.  This huge piece is approximately 6′ x 6′, demanding my attention.  Made of plasticine and wood, this piece is entirely carved, revealing a rich history, mythology, as well as leading to up to current pop culture.  The detail is pristine, as the imagery comes alive from panel on the wall.  The depiction of evolution expresses the continuing changes, crammed among each other, as if occurring in a short period of time.  Maybe it has, we just assume our lifetime is an eternity.  The piece is exhibited along with a touch screen tv, describing in detail all of the intricately carved imagery.  There were plenty of other pieces to discuss in this exhibit, but this was not my primary reason for being here today.  However, this show is an excellent example of the modern and contemporary artwork in the permanent collection.  As a former registrar, I would love to be able to get my hands on these pieces.  I promise I’ll wear gloves. Calaveras 4, Detail James Turrell MFAH also has an amazing light installation.  The James Turrell piece, The Light Inside, takes up an entire underground hallway, connecting one part of the museum to another, the dimensions are 11′ x 20.5′ x 118′.  The media is neon and ambient light.  The entrance is blocked by a large wall of light, which you have to walk around to enter or exit.  There is a solid walkway, while the entire room is filled with light.  It is a little disorienting to walk through at first.  Even though the walkway is only a few feet above the ground, the color makes it seem endless, as if walking over water.  This light piece definitely utilizes the space, creating it’s own environment. And then onto the main attraction: Picasso Black and White.  While Picasso is known for experimenting with color in phases throughout his life, this show focuses on his monochromatic work, stripping the color to focus on the subject, something he Picasso Black and Whitecontinued to do throughout his career.  Unfortunately, since I didn’t purchase a catalog and the security was extremely tight (as to be expected), I have no photos.  It was quite an amazing, as well as ambitious exhibit.  With over one hundred works, his subjects varied from everyday life to the horrors of war.  While Picasso is of course a master and ground breaking artist, his most powerful work is where he is working with a theme, such as Guernica.  The broken fragments of cubism can be used to express emotions of  chaos and violation.  Of course, that piece is not included in the exhibition, however, many of the studies and precursor imagery were.  An artwork so monumental, in both scale and concept, may be worked on for quite a while before realizing the potential of what it is to become.  But there are plenty of beautiful pieces every direction you turn.  One of my favorites is Woman Ironing, depicting working class daily life.  Another is a still life, Cock and a Jar, where the broken imagery brings an incredible energy to an otherwise static display.  Yes, Picasso’s work is amazing. On another floor is the other stunning exhibit, Portraits of Spain: Masterpieces from the Prado.  The polar opposite of Prado: Portraits of SpainPicasso, this exhibit displays the opulence of the ruling class in Spain.  Jewels, ornate clothing, and lavish households of the ruling class are the main subject of these paintings.  In fact, included were several pieces showcasing their amusement, little people.  The wealthy class did not think too much of the commoners they ruled over.  Showcasing several major artists, including Titian, Rubens, and Velasquez, the show would not be complete without Goya.  Goya’s body of work ranges from the elaborate portraits commissioned by the Spanish ruling class, to his raw and expressive still lifes, reminiscent of Dutch still life paintings, and his emotional work portraying war.  The highlight of the entire Prado exhibit was his prints.  The subject matter, the details, the emotion.  None of Goya’s other works compare to the profound imagery he depicts in his printmaking. The amount of art therapy I had was just what the doctor ordered.  Sometimes life is crazy and seems to throw unending curve balls at you.  But the art today did exactly what it is meant to do – allow me to contemplate, offer inspiration, and add an incredible amount of beauty and skill to my day.


Art in the Middle of Nowhere: Marfa, TX

This weekend I went on a road trip to have a reunion and see fantastic art.  I headed west to Marfa, TX.  About six hours from San Antonio, the main part of this trip is desert.  You must fill up your gas tank when you stop, there may not be another one in time to save you.  This tiny town remains largely unknown, except to artists.  Then it is recognized internationally.  In the 70’s, Donald Judd, a minimalist sculptor, discovered this Texas town in the middle of nowhere.  From then on, he worked in both Marfa and New York City and, I believe, truly began his legacy.  Judd’s vision was to display the work of the artists that inspired him in permanent, large scale installations, unlike the short, rotating exhibitions he disliked in New York.  Also, he didn’t feel these artists were properly represented in permanent collections.   With help from huge organizations like the DIA, he was able to purchase large, former military buildings, and in 1986, opened the Chinati Foundation.  It has now expanded to an incredible 340 acres.    He also began the Judd Foundation, that focuses on the preservation of his own work.  The collection features large scale work from Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, and John Chamberlain, to name a few.  That is an incredible collection of art.  From the massive amounts of art he created, to the expansive project Chinati has become, I respect his ambition and can see he created an art community here. When I was in college I went to Marfa for the first time.  It was an amazing experience.  Seeing what Donald Judd has created is inspiring.  With an art compound that large, it is normally only able to be viewed through a guided tour.  Except for one weekend a year, the Chinati Open House.  During this time, you are free to wander through the extensive displays of art on your own.  So far, during this open house is the only time I have ever visited Marfa.  There are also normally plenty of free events that coincide with the weekend.  The first year I went in 2007, my husband and I bought a tent, hopped in the car and headed West.  Not knowing what to expect, we found an amazing community, fantastic art, and a pretty unique experience.  The city had a free barbeque in the evening, after which Sonic Youth played a free show, and ended the next morning with the Chinati Foundation hosting a free breakfast.  Did I mention the word free enough times?  It was such a fantastic experience, the next year, 2008, I organized a trip with some classmates.  There were ten of us on that original trip.  Since then, eight of us have remained friends, artists, and a support system for each other.  Beginning that year with everyone, the event began to change.  No more dinners from the city.  Still a free music event, but nothing as legendary as Sonic Youth.  This has changed the number of people dramatically that attend this weekend.  But that doesn’t detract from the real reason for going – amazing art.  There are still lectures, screenings and readings that relate to the artist or project featured for the weekend.  And of course, there will be the huge permanent installations, always amazing to contemplate in person.  While a few other said they were going to come this year, ultimately, it was the eight of us that returned.  We enjoy experiencing this unique adventure together.

Donald Judd’s Concrete Blocks a few hundred yards from Speed’s studio

The road to the Chinati entrance is dotted with a few older houses.  We find that one of them belongs to the artists Julie Speed.  Having seen her included in many shows, as well as seen books of her work at various museum shops, I am familiar with her art.  We go in and find what an incredible studio she has.  Wonderfully spacious, each room leads to another body of her work.  There are three rooms, then a huge additional room, the largest in the house.  Prints, paintings, and collages line the walls and shelves, displaying her extensive collections of work.  As if that already wasn’t enough, her backyard view is of the huge concrete sculptures created by Judd, made up of fifteen displays of various cement blocks.

Julie Speed

I recently had the privilege of seeing a huge portfolio of her prints at the Southwest School of Art (work in addition to what I was seeing here).  Speed will be showing there next year and Kathy Armstrong, the Director of Exhibitions, had picked up her work.  Speed was very friendly, as I discussed seeing her portfolio.  She willingly shared her techniques on pieces there on display, as well as how she printed her own catalogs for some smaller exhibitions.  The information was very helpful and it was nice that she was easy to talk to.  I always love going to visit people’s studios.  It is, of course, much more revealing than at a gallery space exhibiting only one body of the artist’s work. Arriving at Chianti, it looks like a few old buildings and a lot of desert.  However, enter, and you find a world class collection of Contemporary Art displayed unlike any other museum.  Donald Judd displays his permanent collection of metal boxes in two huge former airplane hangars.  This is a personal highlight of the trip for me.  Jim, a friend of mine, jokes that the hundred boxes no longer

Donald Judd’s boxes blending into the environment, even in the middle of the room

make Judd a Minimalist.  While there were one hundred works in the two buildings, they way they worked with the environment made it feel as if the room was empty.  We discuss how important the environment is to minimalism.  He said the way they are displayed here “cleanses the pallet,” and I absolutely agree.  Placing minimalist pieces alongside artwork from other genres does interfere and take the piece out of context.  This could be argued for almost any artwork, but I believe it is an important element for minimalism.  The slick, fabricated metal boxes played with the reflection from the floor to ceiling windows.  Sometimes where the piece ended and the environment began was blurred.  I think that is what I find mesmerizing about these pieces.  No matter where you are standing, the effect is the same.  I had a difficult time choosing these photos in particular, so many were easily great examples of Judd’s intentions.  Each I time I experience them, I understand a little more.  Making this pilgrimage several times, I still continue to learn learn something new,  each experience evolving my feelings about these permanent installations. On display in another building was a temporary exhibit of some more of Judd’s work, seeing his concepts realized smaller, in a third medium of wood.  They have similar patterns to the

Donald Judd

fabricated metal boxes, but are much smaller in scale, displayed on the wall, and have a much different feel.  These pieces do not react with the environment.  I’m not sure if these are considered studies or completed works, and I also contemplate the huge cement blocks.  I have never considered those to be studies.  Is it just the size that I am thinking about?  Judd does tend to work on a massive scale.  It’s interesting to see an artist work on a particular concept over such a long period of time.  The original thoughts and ideas evolve, as all art should.  It is just more obvious how they evolved on similar series of works.  With Minimalism concerned with the formal elements, you can understand from these pieces that the scale and material are an integral part of his work.

Besides Judd’s metal boxes, my other absolute favorite permanent exhibit here is Dan Flavin.  I have posted seeing his work in New York and Berlin, but this is one of my top two Flavin installations I have ever seen.  The other is the fantastic piece at the Menil in Houston, taking up an entire building.  This installation is much larger in comparison.  Displayed in the center of six different U-shaped buildings, there are two pieces on each side, a total of four physical pieces in each building.  Then there is the way they work together, expanding this installation further.  This unique piece must be viewed from both sides to fully appreciate what he has created.  Each side exposes a different color, working with elements of light and color theory.  Like Judd, Flavin’s work is best displayed without interaction from any other art.  The scale and concepts are enough to stand on their own.  In fact, they thrive that way.  The color pallet alternates buildings from pink and green to yellow and blue, eventually bringing all four colors to the last two remaining buildings.  Flavin’s pieces also play with displaying the light from both an interior and exterior fixed location within the building, changing the perception in each installation.  These pictures are not a very good example of how these pieces are experienced.  Some things really cannot be captured on a camera.  But I had to at least try to show you what I had experienced here.

We then headed a few blocks into town for the lectures.  The main exhibition on focus this Open House is John Chamberlain’s huge collection there.  Housed in a large separate building from the Chinati Complex, I had actually never been there.  Both huge in terms of the scale of the work, as well as the number of pieces that were displayed, it was yet another impressive collection put together by Donald Judd. Saturday, there were two lectures and Sunday, there were three film screenings with or about Chamberlain.  The lecture by Lynne Cook on his process was very insightful.  Her introduction was very impressive, having an extensive resume that included working with world class artists at world class galleries and museums.  It is a dream job to co-curate the Venice Biennale or an exhibit of Richard Serra at the MOMA.  Definitely someone I should be looking to model my career after. When I think of working behind the scenes of an exhibition with big names, my thoughts always go to touching the work.  That’s all I want to do.  Be able to pick up a Cindy Sherman photograph or hang a Jasper Johns print.  Really.  I am getting chills thinking about that right now.  And it’s a real job.  Someone gets to unpack each piece of work for all these travelling exhibits and personally look over it for anything that may have happened when it was shipped.  Of course, the curator has full access to the pieces without actually having to do the physical labor of installation.  Cook discussed Chamberlain’s process, how when working, he was looking for pieces to “fit”.  He visually knew when it was right.  This is how most artists intuitively work, regardless of the medium.  I don’t think anyone that is not an artist can really understand what that means.  It sounds so flighty, maybe even a little poetic.  Showing clips of a film on his work also allowed us to see his incredible studio!  A massive warehouse stored huge piles of auto parts, sectioned by what type of part it was.  It was pretty insane to look at.  Occasionally, I get accused of being a hoarder when people see my collection of materials.  However, it is a tiny pile compared to the enormous stockpile Chamberlain was working from.  What a fantastic studio that must have been to work in!

The largest room housing the collection, but there are three smaller rooms as well

Another reason for my excitement to visit Marfa: Prada Marfa.  This installation by Elmgreen and Dragset was funded by Ballroom Marfa, but actually exists about 35 miles outside of Marfa, in

Prada Marfa

Valentine, TX.  Completed in 2005, the non functioning store houses Prada shoes and purses from the 2005 Fall Collection.  The non function is reinforced by the absence of a door handle.  While housing these valuable commodities, the store itself will eventually deteriorate, decaying back into the landscape, I imagine looking like many of the tiny towns and houses in the area that only now exist as a remnant of the past.  I saw this sculpture two years after it went up, in 2007.  Now returning five years later , I begin to see the wear and tear the building is taking.  Cracks have begun to appear on the facade.  The transformation has begun.  One of my goals is to see this building at sunrise or sunset.  Having only seen photos online, it looks beautiful.  This visit, however, had some disappointment for me.  I had been wanting to do a photoshoot here for a while, so I found a camera and arranged for model months ago.  Unfortunately, the week before the trip, she cancelled, leaving me without enough time to find someone else.  This will have to happen another time. A few people don’t understand why I try to return here annually.  It is the art, but it’s much more than that.  Maybe I am cleansing my own art pallet, clearing my mind from racing imagery and over processed thoughts.  The six hour drive (really 5.40) is a serene coast through the desert, removing yourself from the realities of everyday life.  I can just be here.  Even anonymous in other destinations, there is still an urgency rushing around you.  That is all removed here, where life moves much slower and the art is such an important part of the community.


The Houston Fine Art Fair

Deciding to go to the Houston Fine Art Fair, I was excited to see what all the galleries had to offer.  This is the 2nd annual fair in Houston.  I wasn’t able to attend last year, so I was eager to go this time around.  Only three hours away, my friend and I hopped on the Megabus for about $10 round trip for the both of us and arrived into town.  One of my employers, The Southwest School of Art is hosting a booth there, so I stumble upon a free passes as well.  With 80 galleries in attendance, over 500 artists were represented, displaying a diverse amount of mediums in this huge space. Fine art fairs are interesting.  You get to see so many galleries in a single space, yet they have a limited area to show in and represent themselves with one to maybe five artists.  It is a fun, yet exhausting experience.  Once you sort through the ‘bad’ art, there are still plenty of great artists trying to sell their work and share their ideas.  I need to believe that galleries will show great art from great artists, not just be a showcase for people with connections or money.  There was a combination of both, luckily, still with plenty of interesting artworks to explore. Walking into the huge arena, we find the art fair and immediately see this fantastic huge light piece by Matthew Schreiber in the front ticket area of the show.  One of my favorite mediums to view is light, I love the way it works with the environment.  By deciding to use untraditional materials, I feel an artist needs to use push it to react or engage with the viewer in a different way than traditional mediums, and using the environment is a good way to do this.  This should be a particularly important issue for light artists.  This piece is maybe five or six feet tall,  the same in width, exuding a simplistic, beautiful light. There were other light artists being shown as well.  The pieces by Chul Hyun Ahn were amazing.  Even though they were bound to the wall, it still felt like they went on forever.  The piece on the floor, again, gave the illusion of a bottomless well.  The materials were listed as plywood, lights, and mirrors.  That seems so uncomplicated for something that looks so complex. Another fascinating use of light was an installation by Jay Schinn.  His media was listed a latex paint and light projection.  It was much more luminescent in person. Cheech Marin was there in association with Thomas Paul Fine Art.  He was actually just sitting at the booth, talking to who ever wanted to have a conversation.  The work the gallery was promoting was Carlos DonJuan.  I am familiar with his work, most  recently having seen him in a graffiti group show in Austin, but originally as a grad student at UTSA when I was there.  Since then, I have see his work around, always with a different names – Carlos DonJuan, Carlos Sour Grapes, Miguel DonJuan.  That doesn’t really matter, but I wonder if he will ever eventually choose one name to show under or if he is differentiating between different bodies of work.  If he is, it is not clear to me.  I can always recognize his style before I even see the wall label. I did attend a lecture by Marin, discussing his collection of Chicano art and why it was important to him.  While not having an education in art, he was always attracted to art and studied it in books at the library as a child in East LA.  By the time he started to make money, he felt he was able to distinguish the good art from the bad, and not just like something.  His collection took a particular focus as he started purchasing Chicano Art.  Marin goes on to discuss how you can not be born Chicano, it is something you claim, a culture to connect with.  This is when he directly hit the stigma attached to the word Chicano.  Nobody wanted to show his collection.  However, his tenacity paid off  and he finally got a major corporate sponsor.  His collection then did a huge fifteen city international tour.  The story was very inspiring.  Art is so subjective, it can be very tricky trying to negotiate unknown or experimental projects if people can’t, or won’t understand the vision.  But great artists won’t back down from their ideas and the persistence can be greatly rewarded.  Marin was funny and very insightful to listen to. The work of Laura Ortiz Vega catches my eye immediately.  This past year my interest in street art has really peaked.  I began to realize urban artists are far more visible in the public eye in everyday life than fine artists.  Not to mention street art has slowly been creeping into galleries begging the question is it still street art if it’s in a gallery.  But looking at the fine detail of Ortiz Vega’s work, there is no question this is fine art.  While small in size, the detail of her embroidery is amazing.  If I ever put together a graffiti show, I would love to work with her in the future. Always a fan of great hyperrealism, I was excited to see the work of Luciano Ventrone, represented by Hollis Taggart Galleries in New York.  I was mesmerized by how this artist could accomplish turning paint into a image that looks so real, like a photograph.  I have always been a fan of Richard Estes and other photorealist painters.  The watermelon was so visceral, smashed up, referencing the decaying and used items of food in Dutch Realism paintings.  The only sign that it is a painting is the weave of the canvas when reflected in the light. This installation by the Art Guys is great!  Their art is always witty and fun. Beginning their collaboration at The University of Houston, they continue to work in Houston in many different mediums, including sculpture, performance, and installation.  They also gave a great lecture at UTSA when I was a student there. With over 500 artists being shown, I could obviously go on forever.  These were just a few of the highlights of this art fair for me.  Much more commercial than studio tours, this was an interesting experience.  Finding great artists, ideas for shows to curate, as well as new galleries to add to my list was the objective of this trip.  It is my ambition to get to the Pulse Fair in New York and eventually Frieze in London. I’ve been to both locations before, so it’s not too crazy of a goal, however, the main obstacle is financial.  But this is my Catch 22.  I can get a full time desk job and have money for all of these trips but I would not have the freedom to actually go.  I think I’m doing ok right now.  Besides, I may be in New York soon enough.