Continuously surrounded by art, I write about my experiences and their influences on my artistic practices. I am a starving artist that spends every minute I can being exposed to as many types of art as possible.

Posts tagged “Light Art

Spending Time with Magritte and Twombly in Houston

It’s that time of year again for me, the end of Contemporary Art Month.  Like last year, it is an intense period.  This year, I had to leave before the month was over.  Seven Minutes in Heaven is my biggest curatorial project of the year and then two weeks later I had a solo exhibition of my new body of work, Practice Makes Perfect, at Plazmo contemporary.  As if that wasn’t already enough, there are the tons of exhibits open for Contemporary Art Month.  Every gallery and most artists try to exhibit, it’s an important month.  Of course I had to go to as many as I could fit in.  It is about exposing myself to what people are doing and offering my support for their projects.  I also made a major change in my life and left Ruiz-Healy Art.  Before determining my next direction, I needed some breathing room.

I was photographed attending the Bluestar Opening Party, Three Walls pop-up exhibit at The Warehouse, and at Clamplight's gallery exchange with Flight - They Said We Looked Suspicious

I was randomly photographed attending the Blue Star Opening Party, Three Walls pop-up exhibit at The Warehouse, and at Clamplight’s gallery exchange with Flight – They Said We Looked Suspicious

After my exhibit at Plazmo, there were still shows, including the CAM Perennial 2014 Untitled (Public Display) at the Guadelupe Cultural Center.  This was a two-person show of Mark Menjivar and Christie Blizzard.  I was one of a few selected for a studio tour by visiting curator Leslie Moody Castro in April.  While I wasn’t chosen, I always am glad to have a curator look at my personal work.  I may not be right for this particular project, but I may be for something in the future.  As a curator myself, I know a studio visit can open up working with different people and offer new opportunities.  My friend Alex was also invited to participate in a smaller group exhibition in the Perennial where they took their work off of the walls and walked it around the neighborhood, bring art to the people of the West Side of San Antonio.  Blizard gave away pieces of her artwork for free, I took home this pixilated photograph.  Menjivar “fixed” candles individually for good luck, wealth, and love, adding a piece of art completed by Blizard.  I know Menjivar from when I worked at the Southwest School of Art, so I am always excited to see more of his work.  It turns out he only fixed 40 candles, so I was lucky to get one.

With Mark Menjivar as he "fixes" a candle for me. y Untitled piece by Christie Blizzard

With Mark Menjivar as he “fixes” a candle for me.  My Untitled piece by Christie Blizzard

As usual, I head to my favorite destination, Houston.  There is a great Rene Magritte exhibit, Magritte: Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-1938, at the Menil that I want to go see.

One piece I was eager to see was The Lovers, 1928.  It is romantic and haunting at the same time. Nearby on display was a photo titled Amor, 1928 that was of two people standing together with their heads covered.  Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to find an image of that on the internet. The image of what was real was beautiful.

Magritte, The Lovers

Magritte, The Lovers, 1928

However, when I was searching images, I came across this other painting by Magritte and a photo credited as being of Magritte that reminded me of the Amor photograph.  I’m not entirely sure of the title, it has been coming up just as Lovers, and I can’t find a date to this particular piece.  Sometime, I’m sure I can find some kind of raisonne and get the details.

Magritte, Lovers

Magritte, Lovers

One reason I’m drawn to these particular images is because I have always been impressed when a photograph captures a surreal moment without digital manipulation.  My particular fascination in art is with reality.  The last couple of years I have been working with found objects because they are what exists, discarded remnants of peoples lives.  During this period exhibited here, Magritte plays with reality in many different ways, including a frame within a frame within a frame, what is (or isn’t) an object, or as in the piece Representation, 1937.  Another piece I dedicated some time to, this realistically painted female torso in a shaped canvas entranced me.

Magritte, Representation, 1937

Magritte, Representation, 1937

This exhibition was amazing.  I spent a long time going through, slowly digesting the imagery in front of me.  When I was done, I walked through again.  There was also a smaller exhibit of his later works where Magritte played with reality through visual texture and patterns, but I was not drawn to them, not like his early works. When I was done at the main building, I decided to head to my favorite building, to see Cy Twombly.  Spending time surrounded by the work of Twombly is very contemplative for me.  I have written about a previous experience I had at the Twombly Gallery.

Cy Twombly - A Painting in Nine Parts

Twomby, Four paintings belonging to the series A Painting in Nine Parts

This time around I was able to get some images from one of my favorite bodies of work by Twombly, a set of five paintings, Untitled (Analysis of the Rose as Sentimental Despair), 1985.  This is another body of his work that consists of one title but are made up of several paintings.

Cy Twombly - Analysis of the Rose 1

Twobly, Untitled (Analysis of the Rose as Sentimental Despair), 1985

 

 

 

In his despair he drew the colours from his own heart

Cy Twombly - Analysis of the Rose 2

Twombly, Untitled (Analysis of the Rose as Sentimental Despair), 1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In drawing, and drawing you his pains are delectable his flames are like water

 

 

Cy Twombly - Analysis of the Rose 3

Twombly, Untitled (Analysis of the Rose as Sentimental Despair), 1985

Cy Twombly - Analysis of the Rose Detail

Twombly, Untitled (Analysis of the Rose as Sentimental Despair), 1985, Detail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While I didn’t go to the Dan Flavin installation located in another building by the Menil this time, I did go to the James Turrell on the Rice Campus, Twilight Epiphany.  Unfortunately, I lost the photos I took during the the light show.  But these two photos from before it began show on a low scale the color theory that Turrell applies.

James Turrell, Houston

James Turrell, Houston

This was another quick, yet inspiring trip to Houston.  Art keeps my thoughts processing and clears my head.  I am very fortunate that Houston is so close and regularly has fantastic temporary, as well as permanent exhibits that I love to visit.  Being able to just take in the beauty of it instead of having to organize or explain it is such a different experience.  At the end of it all, I am able to focus and be calm again.


Texas Contemporary Art Fair 2013

This is the third year the Texas Contemporary Art Fair has been in Houston, but my first time attending.  The art displayed here differs greatly from what is exhibited at the Fine Art Fair.  It’s less traditional, more experimental, and as I would expect, pushes the boundaries further.  Contemporary Art is one of my favorite types of art to experience.  Sometimes I want to experience art that makes me think and is relevant to the world today.  While there is beauty in more traditional ideas of art, I’m not sure all of those ideals still apply today.  To be able to view art from recognized artists such as Damien Hirst, Robert Rauschenberg, Nam June Paik, Ann Hamilton, and Andy Warhol is always a fun experience for me. Contemporary Art Fair Immediately walking in, there was a huge pink sculpture looming in the entrance created by Ann Wood.  A small structure with animals on the roof, everything was covered in layers of pink rubbery goo oozing down the Ann Woodsides.  Also covered in flowers, this piece was very tactile, alternating between tacky and smooth plastic.  It was pink, girly, shiny, and attractive, yet grotesque all at the same time.  The animals are very skinny, showing ribs, and covered in this goo as well.  When something is entirely covered, I always think of suffocation and being restricted.  I have previously discussed this particular feeling regarding a sculpture by Cy Twombly and a photograph by David LaChapelle.  My thoughts are also about the objects being merged together, bound by this goo like substance.  The structure itself may be a shelter for hunting, but I’m not entirely sure.  With no other explanation but the title, One More Reason to be Good, I am left to decipher what this piece is about. Clayton BrothersWalking further into the entrance, was another building, a laundromat covered in graffiti.  A familiar place to most people, the inside is lined with brightly colored bottles of detergents that extend to the playful and colorful imagery taking over the walls, spilling out from within.  This has a more welcoming environment that’s well lit, inviting the viewer to enter.  The ritual of doing laundry is something the average person would experience on a regular basis, going to a laundromat to perform this cleansing.  Created by the Clayton Brothers, this piece is titled Wishy Washy.  I get the sense that something should be cleansed, all the components are there to do a load of dirty laundry. This idea of a structure, a familiar place, a shelter, domesticity were strong concepts presented in these two very different installations.  The 1st is a sticky, layered mess, while the latter is a clean, organized location that serves a specific purpose.  The 1st structure is a curious type of place, not existing prior to it’s creation while the other represents a familiar place where you would clean your clothing.  The choice to juxtapose these two different structures as you enter is an interesting choice that I hoped was the beginning of an engaging display of art throughout the fair. There were many major art dealers here.  The Kristy Stubbs Gallery from Dallas had an impressive roster of artists that included Damien Hirst and Robert Rauschenberg.  The Hirst butterfly pieces were priced at $225,000 each.  Well known artists with familiar pieces at serious prices.  This is only the 2nd time I have seen his butterfly pieces in person, the other time in a small gallery in New York that represented more modest pieces by Hirst and Jeff Koons.  In contrast with my 1st experience, these pieces were more intricate. Damien Hirst One of my new favorite light artist was presented here, Chul Hyun Ahn.  I had included his work when I wrote about last year’s Houston Fine Art Fair.  His work appears endless, creating repetition with the use of lighting and mirrors.  A new element existed that I don’t recall seeing last year, was the lighting changed through a spectrum of colors.  His work is now ever changing, both in color and depth, each view point offering a slighting shifting perspective.  Every time I have seen his work, people are always drawn to it, enjoying the illusion created, looking into infinity. Chul Hyun Ayn Another great neon piece is by Tim Etchells.  I have written several times about light pieces, including art I have experienced by James Turrell and Dan Flavin.  I am very drawn to them and will take every opportunity to view them.  The contemporary use of a message is something I am particularly interested in.  Bruce Nauman is one of my favorite pioneers, smartly displaying similar words or shifting text, changing the original context.  Neon has traditionally been used to give information, such as open/closed, enter, XXX, etc.  Now it is often used to express a sentiment, another type of information that is now documented. Tim Etchells With so much intriguing art, it is difficult to just discuss a few pieces.  One thing that did stand out was the amount of art that sold.  Many limited edition pieces sold out.  Red dots seemed to be everywhere.  It is always a good sign to see many pieces of art being sold.  The fact that it is contemporary art also says the art market is currently playful and open minded. Art fairs are an experience.  The opportunity to visit with many galleries from different locations is a rare opportunity.  However, it is just a sample, as most are small spaces displaying a quick view of their most sell-able artists.  My goal is to get to Art Basel (Basel Switzerland or Miami), Pulse (New York), and Frieze (London) someday.  All of these fairs exclusively exhibit contemporary art.  This is just one way to experience art.  I recommend mixing art fairs in with studio visits, as well as  regular visits to the museums of any city you are in or visit.  The more art that I experience, I find I am able to have a better understanding of contemporary art,  a better idea of topics being discussed, and often am introduced to new ideas I have not come across before.  


James Turrell lights up Houston

Since I really enjoy art using light, of course I went to see the work of James Turrell as part of a unique retrospective that is consecutively taking place in three different locations.  The largest installation is at the Guggenheim in New York.  I also read an article about the installations at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA).  Much closer to home, I went to the part taking place at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH).  As the press was coming out, I kept reading about the installations at the Guggenheim and LACMA, but nothing about Houston.  The star piece of the entire exhibition is the light piece that takes over the main rotunda at the Guggenheim.  The images of it look amazing, and I know photos never give light installations justice.  Since I couldn’t find much on Houston, I really didn’t know what to expect.  I greatly admire and draw inspiration from experiencing contemporary art.  The concepts and contemplation that it takes to create some of these pieces amazes me.  Contemporary art fascinates me because it challenges preconceived notions in an intellectual way.  I enjoy thinking about an art piece and seeing an idea in a new way.  Large installations, light pieces, and sculptures are some of my favorite medias to experience.  Another light artist I have been following is Dan Flavin.  I have seen some of his large installations in Marfa and in Houston.

The Light Inside

I have always been amazed at the permanent installation there by Turrell, The Light Inside, 1999, which I briefly wrote about when I was at the MFAH last, in March.  This piece takes over a long underground hallway connecting two buildings.  The tunnel is composed of a walkway maybe just a foot off the ground.  On either side of the walkway is a few feet to the wall, in a light wash of The Light Inside, 1999color.  However,  the way the  light is presented makes it seem endless, like an abyss.  The more you focus on the environment, the more the illusion takes over.  I get a little distorted, it feels like I would fall forever.  Art21 did a great interview with Turrell that focuses on The Light Inside in Houston and the Roden Crater in Flagstaff, Arizona.  The volcano has been his most ambitious project that he has been working on since the 70’s.

Hands down, my favorite installation here is the Ganzfeld, the only piece in this exhibit that you can actually walk into.  No photos, of course.  It is meant to simulate a white out, something that occurs during blizzard, where there is no perception of the space. Experiencing this condition for an extended amount of time has been known to cause hallucinations.  This was created with curved walls, making the room seem endless.  There are people inside to keep you from going over the “edge”.  As with the other pieces, the lights are completely hidden, just casting a glow of slowly changing colors.  LACMA has a Perceptual Cell that costs an additional $45 entry fee and requires a waiver be signed before entering.  That specific piece really may cause hallucinations, being in an isolated cell, just the experience of light.

What is amazing about experiencing work by Turrell is the illusion that is created in the space.  He creates an environment, many of his pieces require their own room.  Some pieces seemed to occupy both negative and positive space at the same time.  This was particularly true of the wall cut outs.  The light seemed to be cubes floating in the air, or breaking up the floor.   The entire time seeming to fluctuate between a physical object in front of you, and a recessed object within the wall.

Going a few blocks away from the MFAH, we walk onto the Rice University Campus.  They have an outdoor permanent installation, Twilight Epiphany, 2012, that sits upon aTurrell at Rice hill.  However, it is actually a man made area, the grass is actually camouflaging the interior seating for the piece.  There are two levels to sit on.  The bottom space is made of marble seating, with tall slanted backs, on the inside of the cube like installation.  The upstairs has the same type of seating but made of concrete, also slanted for you to be at an angle looking upwards.  The upstairs chairs are on the outside of the open cube, so both levels can view above.  The entire structure is covered by a flat roof, with a cut out facing the sky.  This is where the art takes place.  Even before the sunset show began, you can begin to see how the piece subtly changes, with the use of both natural and artificial light.  I have seen the sunset James Turrell at Ricemany times, sometimes able to stop and view this beautiful natural occurrence.  But this particular piece utilizes color theory to create or isolate colors.  A forty minute light “show” unfolds as the sun sets.  The staff requests silence and no photos.  As in the main exhibit, outside light will affect the piece.  It was a very meditative experience.  The sky changed through many different colors – light blue, teal, gray, black, a brilliant colbalt blue.  While the light is progressively getting darker, Turrell then uses the artificial lights projecting onto the roof, bringing the colors from light to dark, and back to light again.  It was a very interesting experience and experiment.  This show also takes place at sunrise.  I think I will have to experience that as well, at some point.

James Turrell at RiceJames Turrell at Rice

A statement was made by the Guggenheim stating the large installation piece in the Rotunda is not a Skyspace, as at Rice.  The specific difference is a Skyspace has an opening to the outside, while the Guggenheim’s opening is covered in glass.

Leaving Houston, in the paper was a story about a woman in Florida that realized she had a Turrell in her home and had been using it for storage.  Disappointing, the new owner is trying to sell the piece.  The bottom of the article has a nice slide show of a few Turrell pieces.

Yes, I am currently dreaming of seeing the Guggenheim exhibit.  Unfortunately, there is no way I could make that happen by the closing September 25.  It would be amazing if I could make a trip for my birthday on September 23….but that will not happen with my current work schedule and financial situation.  However, the show in Los Angeles runs through April 6, 2014.  There is a possibility I could make it there before the closing.  And save an additional $45 for the Perception Cell.  Yes, I would.  I already would like to visit this exhibit at the MFAH again before it comes down.  I will definitely also be revisiting Twilight Epiphany at Rice, as it is a permanent installation.  This exhibit really expanded my mind.  The possibilities of what a media like light can create is endless and ever changing.  Perceptions of color, space, and what is tangible where all pushed and questioned.  I find that exhilarating and the entire reason why I continue to seek new experiences with art.  Of course, my pictures do not do this exhibit justice.  It is something to experience in person.


Art in the Middle of Nowhere: Marfa, TX

This weekend I went on a road trip to have a reunion and see fantastic art.  I headed west to Marfa, TX.  About six hours from San Antonio, the main part of this trip is desert.  You must fill up your gas tank when you stop, there may not be another one in time to save you.  This tiny town remains largely unknown, except to artists.  Then it is recognized internationally.  In the 70’s, Donald Judd, a minimalist sculptor, discovered this Texas town in the middle of nowhere.  From then on, he worked in both Marfa and New York City and, I believe, truly began his legacy.  Judd’s vision was to display the work of the artists that inspired him in permanent, large scale installations, unlike the short, rotating exhibitions he disliked in New York.  Also, he didn’t feel these artists were properly represented in permanent collections.   With help from huge organizations like the DIA, he was able to purchase large, former military buildings, and in 1986, opened the Chinati Foundation.  It has now expanded to an incredible 340 acres.    He also began the Judd Foundation, that focuses on the preservation of his own work.  The collection features large scale work from Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, and John Chamberlain, to name a few.  That is an incredible collection of art.  From the massive amounts of art he created, to the expansive project Chinati has become, I respect his ambition and can see he created an art community here. When I was in college I went to Marfa for the first time.  It was an amazing experience.  Seeing what Donald Judd has created is inspiring.  With an art compound that large, it is normally only able to be viewed through a guided tour.  Except for one weekend a year, the Chinati Open House.  During this time, you are free to wander through the extensive displays of art on your own.  So far, during this open house is the only time I have ever visited Marfa.  There are also normally plenty of free events that coincide with the weekend.  The first year I went in 2007, my husband and I bought a tent, hopped in the car and headed West.  Not knowing what to expect, we found an amazing community, fantastic art, and a pretty unique experience.  The city had a free barbeque in the evening, after which Sonic Youth played a free show, and ended the next morning with the Chinati Foundation hosting a free breakfast.  Did I mention the word free enough times?  It was such a fantastic experience, the next year, 2008, I organized a trip with some classmates.  There were ten of us on that original trip.  Since then, eight of us have remained friends, artists, and a support system for each other.  Beginning that year with everyone, the event began to change.  No more dinners from the city.  Still a free music event, but nothing as legendary as Sonic Youth.  This has changed the number of people dramatically that attend this weekend.  But that doesn’t detract from the real reason for going – amazing art.  There are still lectures, screenings and readings that relate to the artist or project featured for the weekend.  And of course, there will be the huge permanent installations, always amazing to contemplate in person.  While a few other said they were going to come this year, ultimately, it was the eight of us that returned.  We enjoy experiencing this unique adventure together.

Donald Judd’s Concrete Blocks a few hundred yards from Speed’s studio

The road to the Chinati entrance is dotted with a few older houses.  We find that one of them belongs to the artists Julie Speed.  Having seen her included in many shows, as well as seen books of her work at various museum shops, I am familiar with her art.  We go in and find what an incredible studio she has.  Wonderfully spacious, each room leads to another body of her work.  There are three rooms, then a huge additional room, the largest in the house.  Prints, paintings, and collages line the walls and shelves, displaying her extensive collections of work.  As if that already wasn’t enough, her backyard view is of the huge concrete sculptures created by Judd, made up of fifteen displays of various cement blocks.

Julie Speed

I recently had the privilege of seeing a huge portfolio of her prints at the Southwest School of Art (work in addition to what I was seeing here).  Speed will be showing there next year and Kathy Armstrong, the Director of Exhibitions, had picked up her work.  Speed was very friendly, as I discussed seeing her portfolio.  She willingly shared her techniques on pieces there on display, as well as how she printed her own catalogs for some smaller exhibitions.  The information was very helpful and it was nice that she was easy to talk to.  I always love going to visit people’s studios.  It is, of course, much more revealing than at a gallery space exhibiting only one body of the artist’s work. Arriving at Chianti, it looks like a few old buildings and a lot of desert.  However, enter, and you find a world class collection of Contemporary Art displayed unlike any other museum.  Donald Judd displays his permanent collection of metal boxes in two huge former airplane hangars.  This is a personal highlight of the trip for me.  Jim, a friend of mine, jokes that the hundred boxes no longer

Donald Judd’s boxes blending into the environment, even in the middle of the room

make Judd a Minimalist.  While there were one hundred works in the two buildings, they way they worked with the environment made it feel as if the room was empty.  We discuss how important the environment is to minimalism.  He said the way they are displayed here “cleanses the pallet,” and I absolutely agree.  Placing minimalist pieces alongside artwork from other genres does interfere and take the piece out of context.  This could be argued for almost any artwork, but I believe it is an important element for minimalism.  The slick, fabricated metal boxes played with the reflection from the floor to ceiling windows.  Sometimes where the piece ended and the environment began was blurred.  I think that is what I find mesmerizing about these pieces.  No matter where you are standing, the effect is the same.  I had a difficult time choosing these photos in particular, so many were easily great examples of Judd’s intentions.  Each I time I experience them, I understand a little more.  Making this pilgrimage several times, I still continue to learn learn something new,  each experience evolving my feelings about these permanent installations. On display in another building was a temporary exhibit of some more of Judd’s work, seeing his concepts realized smaller, in a third medium of wood.  They have similar patterns to the

Donald Judd

fabricated metal boxes, but are much smaller in scale, displayed on the wall, and have a much different feel.  These pieces do not react with the environment.  I’m not sure if these are considered studies or completed works, and I also contemplate the huge cement blocks.  I have never considered those to be studies.  Is it just the size that I am thinking about?  Judd does tend to work on a massive scale.  It’s interesting to see an artist work on a particular concept over such a long period of time.  The original thoughts and ideas evolve, as all art should.  It is just more obvious how they evolved on similar series of works.  With Minimalism concerned with the formal elements, you can understand from these pieces that the scale and material are an integral part of his work.

Besides Judd’s metal boxes, my other absolute favorite permanent exhibit here is Dan Flavin.  I have posted seeing his work in New York and Berlin, but this is one of my top two Flavin installations I have ever seen.  The other is the fantastic piece at the Menil in Houston, taking up an entire building.  This installation is much larger in comparison.  Displayed in the center of six different U-shaped buildings, there are two pieces on each side, a total of four physical pieces in each building.  Then there is the way they work together, expanding this installation further.  This unique piece must be viewed from both sides to fully appreciate what he has created.  Each side exposes a different color, working with elements of light and color theory.  Like Judd, Flavin’s work is best displayed without interaction from any other art.  The scale and concepts are enough to stand on their own.  In fact, they thrive that way.  The color pallet alternates buildings from pink and green to yellow and blue, eventually bringing all four colors to the last two remaining buildings.  Flavin’s pieces also play with displaying the light from both an interior and exterior fixed location within the building, changing the perception in each installation.  These pictures are not a very good example of how these pieces are experienced.  Some things really cannot be captured on a camera.  But I had to at least try to show you what I had experienced here.

We then headed a few blocks into town for the lectures.  The main exhibition on focus this Open House is John Chamberlain’s huge collection there.  Housed in a large separate building from the Chinati Complex, I had actually never been there.  Both huge in terms of the scale of the work, as well as the number of pieces that were displayed, it was yet another impressive collection put together by Donald Judd. Saturday, there were two lectures and Sunday, there were three film screenings with or about Chamberlain.  The lecture by Lynne Cook on his process was very insightful.  Her introduction was very impressive, having an extensive resume that included working with world class artists at world class galleries and museums.  It is a dream job to co-curate the Venice Biennale or an exhibit of Richard Serra at the MOMA.  Definitely someone I should be looking to model my career after. When I think of working behind the scenes of an exhibition with big names, my thoughts always go to touching the work.  That’s all I want to do.  Be able to pick up a Cindy Sherman photograph or hang a Jasper Johns print.  Really.  I am getting chills thinking about that right now.  And it’s a real job.  Someone gets to unpack each piece of work for all these travelling exhibits and personally look over it for anything that may have happened when it was shipped.  Of course, the curator has full access to the pieces without actually having to do the physical labor of installation.  Cook discussed Chamberlain’s process, how when working, he was looking for pieces to “fit”.  He visually knew when it was right.  This is how most artists intuitively work, regardless of the medium.  I don’t think anyone that is not an artist can really understand what that means.  It sounds so flighty, maybe even a little poetic.  Showing clips of a film on his work also allowed us to see his incredible studio!  A massive warehouse stored huge piles of auto parts, sectioned by what type of part it was.  It was pretty insane to look at.  Occasionally, I get accused of being a hoarder when people see my collection of materials.  However, it is a tiny pile compared to the enormous stockpile Chamberlain was working from.  What a fantastic studio that must have been to work in!

The largest room housing the collection, but there are three smaller rooms as well

Another reason for my excitement to visit Marfa: Prada Marfa.  This installation by Elmgreen and Dragset was funded by Ballroom Marfa, but actually exists about 35 miles outside of Marfa, in

Prada Marfa

Valentine, TX.  Completed in 2005, the non functioning store houses Prada shoes and purses from the 2005 Fall Collection.  The non function is reinforced by the absence of a door handle.  While housing these valuable commodities, the store itself will eventually deteriorate, decaying back into the landscape, I imagine looking like many of the tiny towns and houses in the area that only now exist as a remnant of the past.  I saw this sculpture two years after it went up, in 2007.  Now returning five years later , I begin to see the wear and tear the building is taking.  Cracks have begun to appear on the facade.  The transformation has begun.  One of my goals is to see this building at sunrise or sunset.  Having only seen photos online, it looks beautiful.  This visit, however, had some disappointment for me.  I had been wanting to do a photoshoot here for a while, so I found a camera and arranged for model months ago.  Unfortunately, the week before the trip, she cancelled, leaving me without enough time to find someone else.  This will have to happen another time. A few people don’t understand why I try to return here annually.  It is the art, but it’s much more than that.  Maybe I am cleansing my own art pallet, clearing my mind from racing imagery and over processed thoughts.  The six hour drive (really 5.40) is a serene coast through the desert, removing yourself from the realities of everyday life.  I can just be here.  Even anonymous in other destinations, there is still an urgency rushing around you.  That is all removed here, where life moves much slower and the art is such an important part of the community.