Continuously surrounded by art, I write about my experiences and their influences on my artistic practices. I am a starving artist that spends every minute I can being exposed to as many types of art as possible.

Posts tagged “Erin Stafford

Visiting Dallas: A visit with Erin Stafford, Purity Ring, & the DMA

Purity Ring is an amazing electronic band from Canada.  Their debut album, Shrines, is amazing.  Their show sold out in Austin before I could buy tickets!  However, they were also playing in Dallas, so my friend and I decided to go.  We took the five hour trip on the Megabus for less than $5 roundtrip for both of us.  Since my friend works at the Hyatt, we also got a free hotel room.  The current exhibit at the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) looks like an interesting show.  This should be a good trip. bar belmont, Dallas, TXI set up a meeting with Erin Stafford, one of the artists in Seven Minutes in Heaven (SMIH), currently living in Dallas.  I have known her for a few years, however, this is the first time I will be working with her.  Although, I have seen her work exhibited several times and wrote about one of her recent San Antonio shows in Seduction and Private Moments. We meet at bar belmont at the Belmont Hotel.  It’s a cute bar up on a hill with a fantastic view of downtown Dallas that apparently used to be a crack house.  Interesting.  Sounds like something I would move into with a bunch of other artists.  I have always been attracted to the raw, gritty, real aesthetics of dilapidated, old buildings.  I always want to move in and turn it into something I can use.  We discuss several different projects she is working on and all of Stafford’s ideas are fantastic and fit right into SMIH.  She has a couple of great pieces already completed that I love.  That is great for press, as well, being able to make the deadline to include in our press kit and any additional requests for images.  Best of all, it relates to her paintings, but is an entirely different medium.  I really want the artists in this show to push what they normally would create for an exhibit.

The gorgeous sunset view from bar belmont

The gorgeous sunset view from bar belmont

After drinks, we head back to the hotel to get ready for the show that evening.  We are staying in the middle of Downtown Dallas, and it is nice to stroll through, well lit up.  I love neon and it is everywhere!  I know I have previously written about light pieces from various artists, particularly my favorite, Dan Flavin and several pieces at The Houston Fine Art Fair.  The vintage Greyhound sign is my favorite.  The way the area is lit up makes it fun to walk around and explore.  It’s definitely a different feel from Downtown Houston, where it seems to become a ghost town at night.  I will always be a City Girl, a Downtown City Girl.  Never growing up quite so metropolitan, it all changed when I went to high school in the middle of downtown.  I had so much fun…I never looked back.  It’s the center, where everything and everyone meets.  When I was in high school, I couldn’t realize that my life would be wrapped around a ten mile radius of that school – where I work, where I live, and my studio. Downtown Dallas Neon Downtown Dallas Neon                   The show is great!  Purity Ring sounds amazing in person.  It is electronic music, with the Purity Ring at the Granadaexperimentation being the best part.  I am really amazed this is their first album, I hope they can continue making music without losing what they have captured here.  Although their stage presence could use a make over, they were still fantastic to see live.  It was their first tour, after all. Check them out:  Purity Ring: Fineshrine Purity Ring: Amenamy IMG_8011   The Granada was a nice location, I had never been there before.  One thing that highly interested me was their social media.  On both sides of the stage were huge projection screens.  In between the two bands, they projected their twitter feed.  This caused people to twitter just to see it up on the screen.  Genius!  I think we may have to do this for SMIH.  We haven’t started a twitter account yet, but plan to have that up and running by the show.  It was just a fun way to promote the event.  The comments did get a little “adult” but I would expect no less for SMIH… Of course, I have to fit in art before we leave and head to the Dallas Museum of Art.  I already have plans to visit in May to see the Cindy Sherman Exhibit.  I made a special point to go to New York to see it before, of course I will travel 5 hours to see it in Texas.  It was that amazing.  But today is another show, Cindy Sherman has not yet entered Texas. One of the current exhibits is presenting all women artists, Difference?.  Encompassing various media and themes, the fact that the work was all created by females in the past fifty years is the only connection between the artists in this exhibit, an interesting choice.  Yes, I feel women have a point of view that needs to be expressed.  No, I don’t think it should be exclusive.  Art is in your soul, not your sex.  What I do believe is that both sexes have a different message and have had different experiences.  Art would not be complete if one side was missing, as it was for centuries.  Without these pioneers, my work today might not be taken as seriously.  Louise Bourgeois is a great example.  Seeing her Small Spider sculpture in New Orleans was amazing.  The works exhibited here, at the DMA today, seem so simple, yet carry complex ideas.  Of course, feminist work is included, such as a fantastic piece made out of snaps and latex by Hannah Wilke.  It would be ignorant to ignore such a strong point of view.  But this show encompassed so much more than that one viewpoint that is often associated or blindly labeled with female artwork.  Feminist work was a small part of this exhibit, in no way highlighted or called attention to. Louise Bourgeois - DMA Square Tubes (Vierkantrohre), 1967/2009 by Charlotte Posenenske is intriguing and amusing.  Removing the artists’ hand completely, this piece is made of six industrial Charlotte Posenenske Square Tubes (Vierkantrohre), 1967,2009geometric hollow tubes.  Though Posenenske was in Germany, Donald Judd was working on his minimal pieces fabricated with industrial materials in the US during this same time.  Also removing his hand from the work, his work differs because it is not interactive, he has made all of the decisions.   Posenenske’s work is to be put together by the installer/owner, taking the removal of the artists’ touch even further, while using a considerably masculine material, removing any possible feminine qualities. Tara Donovan, Untitled (Toothpicks), 2004 In stark contrast to the smooth polished metal, is a piece by Tara Donovan.  Untitled (Toothpicks), 2004, this work is anything but inviting.  Created by possibly thousands of toothpicks, this speaks to my love of ritual and repetition.  It is rough, sharp looking, and full of chaos, yet is neatly compartmentalized in a square, uniform shape.  Also in contrast to Posenenske’s work, Donovan uses common daily items, not industrial, specific materials.  This inspires my current series of work greatly.  I have been choosing to work with common items with history and re appropriate them with a different, emotional meaning, expanding them from their strictly utilitarian use.  So, if I didn’t know the title of this exhibition and just viewed the pieces independently, no, I would not have assumed this was an all female show.  It wasn’t all pink and made of roses.  Point made.  Thank you. Another show on exhibit is Variations on Theme: Contemporary Art 1950’s to the Present.  Themes included Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, and the Figure.  Composed primarily from pieces in the DMA collection, This included work from quite a few of my favorite artists.  There is a huge Donald Judd that looks like it goes a couple of stories high and also a Gerhard Richter that differs greatly from his stylistic blurry paintings.   This piece was a mirror.  A blank canvas for the viewer to interact with.  What was interesting to me was that Richter was  displayed near the piece by Michaelangelo Pisoletto, which varied greatly from the last pieces I viewed by him in New York, which were paintings on mirrors.  Again, interacting with the viewer, but putting them in an specific environment.  Today, Pistelleto’s piece is a box on the floor, I believe made out of mirrors, but turned backwards, revealing no reflections, just the coated backside.   Paintings by Mark Rothko and Jackson Pollock also grace the walls.  There is a fantastic neon piece by Bruce Nauman.  Again, I find what people do with light is compelling.  Besides this neon piece, I have seen Nauman create in many different mediums, including sculpture, video, and also a sound installation, Days, at MOMA a few years ago.  This exhibit is displayed in the Barrel Vault, a huge and open gallery space, allowing plenty of room to view or interact with the art.

Bruce Nauman

Bruce Nauman

Mark Rothko

Mark Rothko

This was a fun, quick trip where I feel I got a lot accomplished.  Meeting with Erin, an artist in Seven Minutes, seeing Purity Ring, a great show at the Granada, and the fabulous art at the Dallas Museum of Art is a lot to pack into an overnight trip!  If I’m going to travel five hours, apparently I will make it worth my while.  Now that the DMA offers free general admission, hopefully more people will get exposed to this fantastic collection and amazing travelling exhibits.

 

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Seduction & Private Moments

Second Friday has come around again so I head out to see some art.

Erin Stafford

Erin Stafford

One of the artists exhibiting at REM Gallery is Erin Stafford. I have known her since we went to Berlin together a few years ago, when she was finishing her graduate studies.  She paints very feminine, classic subject matter, and in this show, displayed them in beautiful baroque frames in contemporary colors.  Pearls and jewelry are common themes among her paintings. However, she adds a suggestive touch, updating classic imagery with a more modern, seductive take.  Stafford chooses to present us with another view of these female adornments, one not so polished and perfectly manicured.  What I enjoy most about this series is her ability be seductive with inanimate objects.  When I use words like suggestive and seductive, I expect a portrait, not a still life.  I had been considering her for Seven Minutes in Heaven, and this was my first opportunity to discuss this with her.  I found out she has moved back to Dallas, but was very excited to be invited to the show.

Carter Johnston

Carter Johnston

I decide to check out the art at High Wire Art Gallery.  A large space, there are always several artists showing various media.  In particular, I notice the photography of Carter Johnston.  His unassuming portraits have an interesting take on a personal experience.  All of the photos are of people driving in their cars.  In his artist statement, he discusses the private world that exists when you are surrounded by four walls of metal, able to push out the rest of the world, only interrupted by other drivers, breaking the magic of solitude.  Unaware as Johnston’s shutter clicks, his subjects reveal moments of introspection, withdrawn from reality, if just for a few moments.

Zagros Memar
Italian Stallion, 2008

I laugh as I see an old, beloved painting displayed.  Zagros Memar painted this piece while we were in school, and it has always been a favorite of mine.  The imagery of these conservative women with a stud is playful and insinuating.  The rawness is very expressive, exposing the secrets that goes on behind the closed doors of society.   He has a studio in the back building of High Wire with Holly Simonson and Alex Vargas, but unfortunately it is closed tonight.  Normally it is open while they paint or display their art for sale. There is a band jamming together, experimenting with sounds in the open studio area.  I know High Wire encourages musicians to jam together, both the owners, Ray and Cindy Palmer can often be found in the middle of the instruments.  I have also seen Vincent Valdez join them with his trumpet, although not tonight.

Seth Camm at work

There is also a small space in the front that has paintings, prints, and sculptures for sale, although not a part of the current exhibit.  Walking in, there is a portrait being painted of a seated subject.  Seth Camm is the artist, explaining to me that portraits are a good way to make extra money.  I definitely understand that.  I am the queen of making a living from anywhere I can. Still at High Wire, I ran into Thomas Cummins, a photographer that has large scale work currently displayed in the Window Works at Artpace.  I was at the opening reception last month and heard him talk about the bridge he photographed.  Another Thomas Cummins met his demise off that bridge, so he went and paid a visit.  Linda and I recently were going through our artist list and she had brought him up as someone she was interested in having in the show.  The three of us have shown together in at least one group show at JusticeWorks last year.  He is interested, but a little apprehensive because he is an architectural photographer.  I discuss that Barbara Justice is also and she more than rose to the challenge of Seven Minutes, even getting a review of her piece.  I tell him to think about it, there still is almost nine months until Contemporary Art Month.  He is still interested and I tell him I will get with him to show him the coloring book and reviews from the show. This art evening has been very productive.  Anytime I get a little work done on Seven Minutes I am extremely happy.  My goal is to have the majority of the artists confirmed by the end of the summer.  Now that I have more experience and know better what to expect from putting on a large, independent group show, I am more determined to complete things in a much earlier time frame.