Continuously surrounded by art, I write about my experiences and their influences on my artistic practices. I am a starving artist that spends every minute I can being exposed to as many types of art as possible.

Posts tagged “Antonio Diaz

Heading to the Big Easy: New Orleans

With the new year ahead of me, or maybe I just got the itch to travel, I planned an impromptu trip to New Orleans.  I was planning a regular trip to Houston to visit a friend, when I decided to go to New Orleans for a relaxing time.  There is also the New Orleans Museum of Art, which I have never visited before.  So I rented an apartment, headed to Houston for free on the Megabus (there is a promotion for free travel if seats are available, through Feb 29!  Promo code: TRYMEGABUS), where a friend picked us up, and we drove about five more hours, into New Orleans. Although, quickly, some (fun) work is added.  On the way there, I get an email confirming Antonio Diaz from Austin is still in Seven Minutes in Heaven II.  It has been a while since I invited him, so I am glad he will still be joining the group.  I found his prints insinuating and erotic, a perfect fit for SMIH II.  I also get a text from the Southwest School Gallery Shop, my now former job.  I have been on the list to purchase some of the display pedestals.  Everything from the store is for sale, since it closed.  Of course, I would be out of town, and unable to go in and pick them out now.  Lucky for me, I already know what’s there and what I want.  Making some quick decisions, I make some purchases through text, calling after we arrived to pay by credit card. Since Vanessa Centeno, one of the Seven Minutes in Heaven II artists, is living there, working on her MFA at the University of New Orleans, I set up a little more work, meeting her at a local spot.  It is great to see her, it has been since last April, when I originally invited her.  Already known in San Antonio for her paintings, she presented her idea for video for SMIH II, which I am excited about.  My curating style of working with solid, intelligent artists makes it easier to encourage experimentation.  I want to work with artists pushing limits and that often involves unpredictable results.  A lot of risk taking is involved in making and exhibiting provocative, thought-provoking art. New Orleans FogUnfortunately, the weather was anything but ideal.  It was chillier than we would prefer and it is foggy as hell.  Standing at the water, you can only see about a hundred feet into the Mighty Mississippi.  That was a little disappointing.  However, everything else was absolutely fabulous!  Our two bedroom apartment was cute and walking distance to everything.  There was plenty of amazing art, beautiful cemeteries, fantastic buildings, great food, and definitely interesting people!  NOLA never disappoints! Visiting the New Orleans Museum of Art is high priority for me.  The building that it is located in is beautiful.  My friend, Katherine Marquette, worked here prior to moving to San Antonio.  How amazing would that be to come here every morning?  Is that too much to ask, to work in a historical building surrounded by world-class art?  Sigh.  That is

NOMA - New Orleans Museum of Art

NOMA – New Orleans Museum of Art

the goal one day.  They had an amazing exhibition up, “Lifelike,” that I really enjoyed.  The exhibit focused on contemporary realism, comprised of objects that were distorted by their scale.  Spanning from the 1960’s to the present, the work discussed various ideas from over fifty artists.  Unfortunately, there were no photos allowed and the gift shop was currently sold out of the catalog right then, but said I could buy a copy on Amazon.  I will have to do that.  Their permanent contemporary collection was also impressive, including Yves Kline, John Chamberlain, Joan Mitchell, Richard Diebenkorn, John McCracken, Basquiat, and Warhol.  These artists are always incredibly inspiring to me, I have previously posted about most of them already.  Mitchell is an artist I wish I had an opportunity to see more of in person.  Her bold, gestural work is beautiful to look at up close.  I think this may only be the third piece I have had the pleasure of viewing.  I was fortunate to see Diebenkorn’s Ocean Park Series in Fort Worth last year.  The layered, worked over, and revealing subtractions are what I find the most interesting about his work. NOMA Art 2 John McCracken always reminds me of a contemporary art class I took in college.  One student looked at photos just like this one and kept asking “what color is it?”, because of the light reflecting on it.  Even this photo shows light and dark gradations due to the lighting.  Isn’t that the point of using such a highly reflective surface?  I’m so glad to be out of school.  But I guess I do have some affection towards McCracken, I did also post a photo of his beautiful red piece at SAMA.  The slick, polished Minimalist planks are perfectly crafted, made using industrial materials.  I enjoy the simplistic expression of  Minimalism.  I could never explain anything that basic, my layered work relates to what a complicated person I am.  As with Donald Judd, I am particularly attracted to the simplicity of the presentation, perfect aesthetics, and exploration of space.  The space these pieces occupy interests me because they simultaneously engage two spaces, placed on the floor like a sculpture, but also positioned on the wall, a place normally reserved for paintings.  This is characteristic of this particular series, his other work is comprised of free-standing pieces. A surprise for me was the largest collection of Joseph Cornell I have been able to view together.  Considered a pioneer of assemblage, Cornell’s pieces interest me because he has assembled objects once considered precious, often still recognizable, invoking feelings of nostalgia, while at the same time, their original beauty, and sometimes use, has been lost.  The raw, real, everyday objects discuss collecting and time, while creating enigmatic narratives.  The format of assemblage put together in boxes is also very inviting.  I want to further investigate these collections of things.  His work extends also into collages, which I consider 2-D assemblages, or assemblages as 3-D collages, connecting by creating new thoughts out of existing remnants.  They are fun to view, placed in a room on their own.  Since Marfa, I appreciate a little more when a larger collection of an artist is kept in context of their own work to contemplate together.

Joseph Cornell

Joseph Cornell

The most fantastic discovery of all was the Sculpture Garden.  I finally got to see one of Louise Bourgeois’s “Small” Spiders.  There are quite a few of them displayed throughout the world.  While a small one, it stands above me as I walked in and out of her long, elegant legs.  I have seen many of her pieces, however, this is the first outdoor, large-scale piece I have seen.  She is represented in most collections, considered an important artist, discussing fears, anxiety, confusion, and sexual desires in her works.  Of course, it is always exciting to see Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen.  Their massive sculptures of common, everyday objects are elevated by being increased to a monumental scale.  At 21’, Safety Pin towers over the park, demanding your attention, one of my favorite characteristics of Pop Art.  It’s always fun to see their pieces, I love their Horseshoe in Marfa.  It is not clear in the photo, but the Ladder piece by Leandro Erlich is not held up by anything in the back.  It is amazing to look at.  There are so many pieces I could discuss.  This fantastic Sculpture Garden was so fun to explore.  There were many other great sculptures, including pieces by Rene Margritte and Fernando Botero. NOMA Sculpture Garden2 Nearby the museum, we randomly find St. Louis Cemetary #3.  New Orleans cemeteries are beautiful.  There are graves, as well as places where ashes of families are together that range from boxes to buildings.  French influenced, many of the above ground structures remind me of the Pere Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.  There are still many differences that make it unique to NOLA, which is what I want to capture.  When I go to cemeteries in different regions or a different country, I am searching for how that culture celebrates death and those who have passed.  Marble, sculptures of Saints and Angels adorn many sites. It doesn’t take long to discover some rituals that you would only find in New Orleans.  One site has Mardi Gras beads strewn around.  I bet during Mardi Gras the grave sites will be covered with them.  That would make some nice photos.  Another has simply a bottle of oil, something I have never seen before, and I wonder if it has something to do with Voodoo.  One site has a jar of some kind of food.  It looks odd, and may be aged, rotting food left a while ago, or something else possibly related to Voodoo.  I am excited to find new customs that I have not seen before.

St. Louis Cemetery #3

St. Louis Cemetery #3

At this point, I have been working on this large cemetery photo project for about twelve years, possibly towards an exhibit or book or, hopefully, both.  My fascination with cemeteries has been since I was in high school.  It’s interesting to think how something cultivates and captures your attention for that long.  I have always found them beautiful.  When I was in Munich a few years ago, there was an exhibit on Hermann Obrist at the Neue Pinakothek.  An accomplished Art Nouveau sculptor and designer in Germany, this exhibition focused on his sculptures and “funerary monuments.”  Unaware of who Obrist was, running into that show was purely coincidental.  I squeezed in the Modern and Contemporary Art by myself on a day off.  It was nice to see I wasn’t the only one who appreciates the beauty that lies inside the cemetery gates.

Hermann Obrist Exhibit, Munich, Germany

Hermann Obrist Exhibit, Munich, Germany

This was a quick few days during the week, but that didn’t stop it from being a fun, inspiring, and productive trip.  It’s been about ten years since I was here last and it was just as fun as I remember.  There is definitely still a lot to explore – gallery spaces, plenty more cemeteries, architecture, and the vibe that the entire city gives off.  I will definitely be back.

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East Austin Studio Tours

November means it’s time for studio tours!  The East Austin Studio Tours takes place this month annually, in fact this is the 11th annual E.A.S.T.  I have been going for quite awhile now and have always enjoyed visiting artist’s studios.  At the time, I didn’t realize how important these tours would become for me or even that they would become something I would do to work.  I just knew I liked it, so I kept doing it.  Now, there are several objectives I have when doing studio tours.  First, I want to see what is out there – what ideas other artists are working on now, the media, their surfaces.  Second, I am curating.  This began by keeping track of artists I was interested in working with, yes, just in my head.  Then I finally started to see enough artists I liked working on similar ideas.  The exhibitions I am currently piecing together include nontraditional contemporary portraiture, nontraditional landscape, and experimental process or media.  And, of course, my main and largest project by far, Seven Minutes in Heaven 2013.  However, a new priority is really observing these studio spaces for, well, their space.  I want to compare how they store their work and supplies, divide their work space, display their art, or find new ways to use the space.  Yes, I have always noticed, lusting after these large studios.  But now it’s all possible.  If I want it, I now have a place to make it happen. A little low on funds, I decided to experiment with how I could make this work.  The tours take place over two weekends, with over 200 locations on the map, this included hundreds of artists.  I could only attend the first weekend, next weekend is the Houston Artcrawl.  I meant to rent a room, but I waited to long and couldn’t afford that.  So I booked two roundtrip tickets on Megabus to go both Saturday and Sunday.  My total was $12 – for both days.  That is less than gas for one trip.  That is why I love Megabus.  The only drawback is that you can’t bring a bike.  Luckily, since all the studios are fairly close in proximity, walking is a great option. Day 1 of the tour is very disorganized for me.  I forgot how important it is for me to plan ahead and nothing was really going according to my loose plan anyway.  Due to an accident on the freeway, I arrived an hour and a half later than expected.  A friend from school and her husband met me and we drove not too far into the East Side of Austin.  I had been so busy, I did not print a map, I figured I would just pick one up at one of the locations, I knew the general area.  Yes, we got to the general area, no, there were no maps or catalogs available.  They were all gone, this is a very popular tour.  I was disappointed, the catalogs are actually a beautiful highlight of the tour, the one for the West Austin Studio Tours earlier in the year was very impressive.  In fact, I feel the Austin Tours are a great model for artist studio visits, one of the largest and best organized.  After what seemed like an eternity, I printed a map at the library and we were on our way.  By not going through the list to edit, this caused major mistake #2.  With a couple hundred of artists to view, I will probably only be interested in 25 – 35% of the art, and only about 10% will I seriously be interested in working with.  While exploring is fun, with so much, there needs to be some organization.  So a lot of Day 1 was spent trying to gain my bearings.  I saw a lot of art, but not really anything that I would seriously consider.  So I began to prepare for Day 2 on the ride home.  I began to comb through the artist list.  This begins by identifying the locations with the most artists there.  If I had a catalog, each artist or location gets a page with an image of their work and their website.  But no such luck and the catalog is not listed online yet either.  That makes trying to form a strategic plan a little difficult. Day 2 was a million times better!  First, I arrived on time.  Armed with my map, I jumped in a cab and got dropped off at the furthest point away that I wanted to visit.  And just spent the day walking back, hitting as many studios as I could.  This included Big Medium, Pump Project Art Complex, and ARTPOST.  Those three spaces alone had over fifty artists. IMG_6974A major highlight was finding Industry Print Shop.  Immediately, I recognized the style of prints by the artist I saw at the Mexi-Arte Museum Graffiti Exhibit.  There his work opened the show, overtaking the entire first wall.  He has some work up, as well as some smaller prints on a table for sale.  The works are sensual advertisements using sex for promotion.  To promote what?  These pieces don’t have a product to sell, just imagery and catchy slogans.  These prints feel nostalgic, designed like vintage signs, but I begin to realize it’s also in the attitude.  The sexy tart can always get what Antonio Diazshe wants.  But how do those attitudes work today?  Sex sells more than ever.  Are these women being taken advantage of or in control of the situation?  How have these attitudes changed in the last 50 years?  Can a woman embrace her sexuality?  While sex sells, there still remains the stigma of being a whore.  Sex will make money but the woman better act like she doesn’t know anything about that.  I pick a print to purchase, how can not?  I also buy an awesome shirt for a gift.  All I had to do was ask for more info.  The artist is Antonio Diaz, and he is (one of?) the owner(s) of Industry.  I let him know I am a fan of his work.  Mentioning seeing their work somewhere else is always a great way to begin a conversation with an artists I want to meet.  They are interested when you know their work or have seen their other shows.  We go into his office and he shows me some more prints.  I discuss Seven Minutes in Heaven 2013, inviting him.  He would make a great addition to the show.  Interested, he gives me his card, I will definitely be in touch.  I have just begun to finally organize things for Seven Minutes in Heaven 2012.  Working on the Invisible Gallery website for several months now, I have organized SMIH 2012 page with the artists and press.  I would love for this to work out. IMG_7084 I love that during his open studio tour, Mark Johnson sits facing the corner of his studio, clacking away on a vintage typewriter, not paying attention to the crests of people in and out.  His mixed media works include various typography, referencing the home and domesticity.  There is a sense of longing, a void was left from all the chaos.  I find his work compelling and would possibly like to work with him in the future, although I have no idea right now where he would fit in.  Nothing I am currently working on.  But that doesn’t mean something won’t come up.  I can’t find any cards and I feel awkward trying to talk to him as he is typing away.  But I ask if him for his card, he politely stops, hands me the top piece of paper from a pile, each piece freshly typed as I was there.  The little piece of art with his most recent words was his card.  Yes, it had his contact information.  Back to typing. Mark Johnson Discovering the Pump Project Art Complex for the first time was cool.  There are a couple of collective studios there, such as MAKEatx and Women Printmakers of Austin.  There are also quite a few individual artists studios there, as well.   I find the ceramic work of Debra Broz.  Her manipulation of decorative kitsch is playful.  They are incredibly well crafted.  Taking these items from thrift shops, she alters them in an amazing way, where you cannot tell that it was not originally like that.  But you know it wasn’t.  This is her skill, her trade is a porcelain restorer.  A multi talented woman, she is also the director of Pump Project. IMG_7070IMG_7074 IMG_6985The photography of Jon Oldag catches my interest.  Stitching together photos physically versus digitally doing this in Photoshop is a lost craft he is continuing.  This gives the image a soul, some motion, in contrast to the flattened quality a computer can often produce.  There is always an attraction to the handmade, something exhibiting the artists’ touch.  He is actually selling his work for whatever you would like to offer him.  As much as I would love a piece, I have no cash and he is not taking credit cards. And then I found a free catalog at a little gallery.  I was so excited!  It really is a nice book, a great reference for Austin artists, and advertised as the companion book to the West Austin Studio Tours catalog from earlier in the year, which I have.  They were for sale at Big Medium, but free at all the other galleries in limited quantity.  As usual, I was on limited on funds.  What I do have I will spend on art.  It’s really good.  This was such a productive day, I am extremely pleased with the amount of work I got done.  Finding one artist for SMIH is a huge accomplishment.  The Austin Studio Tours always have intriguing art, I always find new artists to work with, get explore new spaces, and return to favorite spots.  I think this may have been the very first large studio tour that I ever went on, who knows how long ago.  Finding diversity in media is always welcome.  I really chose to discuss these artists randomly based on how much I like their work.  Afterwards is when I noticed I was discussing screen printing, mixed media, ceramics, and photography. Obviously, I feel it still delivers fresh artwork every year.


Weekend with Godard and Graffiti

My friend invited me to head to Austin to see Weekend1967 by Jean-Luc Godard.  Having seen a few of Godard’s films, this was a new one for me.  A great director of French New Wave, I always enjoy watching experimental film.  We take the Megabus, a bus service that has expanded their market from the East Coast into Texas.  For less than $5 round trip for both of us, it is an easy and worry free journey. 2.0 The Paramount Weekend is showing at the Paramount Theater, a beautiful and classic venue, located in downtown Austin.  It’s a nice experience viewing a movie here.  Playing with the convention of both the plot The Paramountand editing, Godard gives a small portrayal of the broken and fragmented minds that covet money and possessions over the value of life.  Roland and Corinne are a married couple taking a trip to collect an inheritance.  Quickly understanding there is little else they care for, they attempt running over pedestrians, nonchalantly walk through dead bodies, and have a disdain for even each other, as they plot the death of one another.  Throughout the movie, Corinne collects clothing from each event, changing her outfit several times.  This is a great trailer for Weekend, the entire movie done in this random sort of format.  Flashing words, inappropriately played music, and including the breaking of the picture reel at one point, are all Godard’s stylistic way of portraying his observations of society. This is another fantastic collage of Godard’s imagery: Original French Weekend Trailer.  While no dialogue is in the beginning of this clip, the silhouetted figures are a great representation of the dead, emotionless conversation they are having, illustrating their feelings for everything and everyone, including each other.  Roland iA still from Weekends very disinterested as Corinne describes a threesome she had, asking her only “and then” in a bored voice and “is that all.”  Her casual body language in this still, reflects her careless attitude as well, her head propped up by her hand.  Although, I wish this trailer had subtitles to understand a few parts.  The first young woman covered in blood and screaming is yelling how her rich, dead  boyfriend is the one worth living, the life of a poor peasant is worth nothing.  Another crash, the cars are on fire, and the only time Corinne is screaming, she is hysterically shrieking “My purse! My purse!”, as Roland rolls out from the burning car.  And at the end, when she is eating, she is told she is eating her husband.  She calmly asks for a second helping to go, for her to eat later.  Ending the film with Fin de Cinema, the End of Cinema, this was also the last film Godard did in this manner, choosing to focus on a documentary style. Because I always love hearing German, here is a another clip I found, Weekend Dubbed in German Why am I not surprised that this consists mainly of her taking a bath?  Well, it’s perfectly natural as the portrait she is imitating suggests.  Even though the camera is focused on Corinne as she bathes, the entire time Roland is lecturing her, the only nudity is the portrait hanging behind her. If you’re really interested in Weekend, here is the famous Weekend Traffic Jam Scene With Commentary that brings the story to a halt and lasts seven minutes.  It is discussed how Roland and Corinne are breaking the rules, an example of how they treat societies civilized mores “visual variety”.  There is also a longer 15 minute clip, with two great monologues juxtaposed with an interesting choice for imagery. Update: Weekend has been added to the Criterion Collection!  If you want to watch amazing movies, they are usually released by Criterion or Janus Films. Since I didn’t plan this weekend trip, I had no art itinerary planned.  But walking down Congress, we passed the Mexic-Arte Museum that was advertising a graffiti show, so we had to stop in.  Having never been in here before, I was impressed with the layout, very spacious – a great place to exhibit. Antonio Diaz Walking into the exhibit, the first wall is taken by a huge pop mural, grabbing my attention immediately.  I have always been a fan of pop and Andy Warhol, particularly loving the bright, bold colors.  Not one for subtly myself, I appreciate not being afraid to express something in a loud manner.  The subject matter always intrigues me.  Usually comments on society, I think it is very clever to pick up on everyday thoughts and imagery that has seeped into our subconscious and realize that even though we are bombarded with this now, it is actually a fleeting experience that is unique to our society at this particular moment.  I love that art can actually document something as intimate as our attitudes.  While a time capsule may preserve history and reveal many things, pop takes it in a different direction.  Loud, brash, and unapologetic, it has always stated the obvious right now.  Focusing on subjects like commercialism and consumerism, these pieces force you to contemplate the same things that overload your brain everyday, hopefully, making you aware and rethink the things that are constantly blurred in the background of everyday life, buzzing around you.  I am very interested in the fact that a graffiti exhibit is making my thoughts go to Warhol and his philosophies.

Antonio Diaz

Antonio Diaz
Damsel in Distress #2 (left), Three-color Screenprint, 36″ x 24″
War Hall (right), Screenprint on Industrial Boards, 13’6″ X 6″

I recognize the work of another artist in the show, Miguel DonJuan.  It’s weird because the imagery is very different than what I’ve previously seen of his work.  In fact, Miguel DonJuan, La Tigre, 2012, mixed media on birch, 4'x3'there is very little exposed wood, normally characteristic of his pieces.  But there are masked faces and graffiti, and although done differently, they still seem familiar to me.  The work still seems to deal with the topic of concealed identity, a particular issue for graffiti artists.  In this series of work, the figures are animals or donning an animal mask.  This work incorporates some words in Spanish, another varied element, I normally see his work as referencing other cultures.  He was in the Graduate program at UTSA when I attended there.  I have seen his work under Carlos DonJuan, Carlos SourGrapes, and now Miguel DonJuan.  I’m not sure why the use of different names, although his bio explains he is part of the Sour Grapes Collective. Niz.On the Fence, 2012,aerosol paint on found object,25x25There is an interesting piece by Niz, I believe the only solo female artist in the show.  Created with aerosol paint, I love the use of an old window as the object to directly paint on while also framing the work.  There are so many windows already in my collection…It’s nice to see old materials being incorporated into art.  This particular piece is political, discussing current concerns about the border.  Old, weathered items can help illustrate a mood or certain points you are trying to make.  A new window wouldn’t suggest an issue that as been there for a while, having a history. More images from the show by Origin of Cool. Since my friend collects vinyl, we head to End of an Ear, a fantastic record store.  Interestingly enough, we run into an album with the artwork of one of the artist that I represent, Linda Arredondo.  It is always great to see artists I am working with have their art exposed to different viewers. This piece was actually purchased at Justiceworks, I remember their farewell show late 2011.  Designed by fellow San Antonio artist, James Woodard for the band The Grasshopper Lies Heavy.  This was from her Monsters in Love series of mixed media pieces. Linda Arredondo & The Grasshopper Lies Heavy AustinAustin is a fun little town just a jump away from San Antonio.  I love that I can change scenery so easily.  As usual, I packed quite a bit into an overnight trip, experiencing film, art, and music here. Austin