Continuously surrounded by art, I write about my experiences and their influences on my artistic practices. I am a starving artist that spends every minute I can being exposed to as many types of art as possible.

Texas Contemporary Art Fair 2013

This is the third year the Texas Contemporary Art Fair has been in Houston, but my first time attending.  The art displayed here differs greatly from what is exhibited at the Fine Art Fair.  It’s less traditional, more experimental, and as I would expect, pushes the boundaries further.  Contemporary Art is one of my favorite types of art to experience.  Sometimes I want to experience art that makes me think and is relevant to the world today.  While there is beauty in more traditional ideas of art, I’m not sure all of those ideals still apply today.  To be able to view art from recognized artists such as Damien Hirst, Robert Rauschenberg, Nam June Paik, Ann Hamilton, and Andy Warhol is always a fun experience for me. Contemporary Art Fair Immediately walking in, there was a huge pink sculpture looming in the entrance created by Ann Wood.  A small structure with animals on the roof, everything was covered in layers of pink rubbery goo oozing down the Ann Woodsides.  Also covered in flowers, this piece was very tactile, alternating between tacky and smooth plastic.  It was pink, girly, shiny, and attractive, yet grotesque all at the same time.  The animals are very skinny, showing ribs, and covered in this goo as well.  When something is entirely covered, I always think of suffocation and being restricted.  I have previously discussed this particular feeling regarding a sculpture by Cy Twombly and a photograph by David LaChapelle.  My thoughts are also about the objects being merged together, bound by this goo like substance.  The structure itself may be a shelter for hunting, but I’m not entirely sure.  With no other explanation but the title, One More Reason to be Good, I am left to decipher what this piece is about. Clayton BrothersWalking further into the entrance, was another building, a laundromat covered in graffiti.  A familiar place to most people, the inside is lined with brightly colored bottles of detergents that extend to the playful and colorful imagery taking over the walls, spilling out from within.  This has a more welcoming environment that’s well lit, inviting the viewer to enter.  The ritual of doing laundry is something the average person would experience on a regular basis, going to a laundromat to perform this cleansing.  Created by the Clayton Brothers, this piece is titled Wishy Washy.  I get the sense that something should be cleansed, all the components are there to do a load of dirty laundry. This idea of a structure, a familiar place, a shelter, domesticity were strong concepts presented in these two very different installations.  The 1st is a sticky, layered mess, while the latter is a clean, organized location that serves a specific purpose.  The 1st structure is a curious type of place, not existing prior to it’s creation while the other represents a familiar place where you would clean your clothing.  The choice to juxtapose these two different structures as you enter is an interesting choice that I hoped was the beginning of an engaging display of art throughout the fair. There were many major art dealers here.  The Kristy Stubbs Gallery from Dallas had an impressive roster of artists that included Damien Hirst and Robert Rauschenberg.  The Hirst butterfly pieces were priced at $225,000 each.  Well known artists with familiar pieces at serious prices.  This is only the 2nd time I have seen his butterfly pieces in person, the other time in a small gallery in New York that represented more modest pieces by Hirst and Jeff Koons.  In contrast with my 1st experience, these pieces were more intricate. Damien Hirst One of my new favorite light artist was presented here, Chul Hyun Ahn.  I had included his work when I wrote about last year’s Houston Fine Art Fair.  His work appears endless, creating repetition with the use of lighting and mirrors.  A new element existed that I don’t recall seeing last year, was the lighting changed through a spectrum of colors.  His work is now ever changing, both in color and depth, each view point offering a slighting shifting perspective.  Every time I have seen his work, people are always drawn to it, enjoying the illusion created, looking into infinity. Chul Hyun Ayn Another great neon piece is by Tim Etchells.  I have written several times about light pieces, including art I have experienced by James Turrell and Dan Flavin.  I am very drawn to them and will take every opportunity to view them.  The contemporary use of a message is something I am particularly interested in.  Bruce Nauman is one of my favorite pioneers, smartly displaying similar words or shifting text, changing the original context.  Neon has traditionally been used to give information, such as open/closed, enter, XXX, etc.  Now it is often used to express a sentiment, another type of information that is now documented. Tim Etchells With so much intriguing art, it is difficult to just discuss a few pieces.  One thing that did stand out was the amount of art that sold.  Many limited edition pieces sold out.  Red dots seemed to be everywhere.  It is always a good sign to see many pieces of art being sold.  The fact that it is contemporary art also says the art market is currently playful and open minded. Art fairs are an experience.  The opportunity to visit with many galleries from different locations is a rare opportunity.  However, it is just a sample, as most are small spaces displaying a quick view of their most sell-able artists.  My goal is to get to Art Basel (Basel Switzerland or Miami), Pulse (New York), and Frieze (London) someday.  All of these fairs exclusively exhibit contemporary art.  This is just one way to experience art.  I recommend mixing art fairs in with studio visits, as well as  regular visits to the museums of any city you are in or visit.  The more art that I experience, I find I am able to have a better understanding of contemporary art,  a better idea of topics being discussed, and often am introduced to new ideas I have not come across before.  

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One response

  1. Pingback: 2013: Another Year of Art | How Not To Make A Living As An Artist

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