Continuously surrounded by art, I write about my experiences and their influences on my artistic practices. I am a starving artist that spends every minute I can being exposed to as many types of art as possible.

The Houston Artcrawl

This past weekend I headed to Houston to do more studio tours.  This is only my 2nd time going to the Artcrawl, but I really enjoyed it last year, so my friend and I decided to head north.  There are almost 200 artists participating, but this event is very different from the Austin studio tours.  The biggest difference is that the Artcrawl only takes place in one day, where as the Austin tours are over two weekends.  Last year I was a little disappointed in having such a short time to explore so many artists and spaces, but this year I was much more prepared.  The fact that all of these artists are all in only about nine spaces really helped, other studio tours are much more spread out with less artists in more locations.  In Houston, there seems to be a preference for renting studio spaces in large warehouses, or maybe that is just what is primarily available.  While it is always great to work around or be associated with other artists, renting a studio with so many other people usually means there is a lot more bad art than good.  But I will continue to look for artists that I want to work with, even though most of the time it does mean sifting through a lot of other art I’m not interested in.  That’s ok.  I try to prepare as much as I can by going through the artist list first.  I still need to see what people are working on, what materials are used, topics being discuss, and how the work is presented.  I always have a lot to learn from other artists. Meeting with another friend in Houston,  the three of us begin the Artcrawl at Mother Dog Studios, a huge Kelly Alisonwarehouse comprised of easily over fifty artists.  Immediately walking in, there is a huge wall filled with the work of Kelly Alison.  She is an artist I had previously worked with in Unconscious Desires, an exhibit I curated in 2009.  Her colorful depictions of birds are engaging.  The works exhibited here are all oil on paper, each measuring 28″ x 22″.  There is always so much going on in her imagery, it’s hard not to get pulled in.  These pieces are part of a series Tweet, 2011, in which Alison completed a piece every day for 365 days.  On display she has 24 out of the 365 pieces.  Based on current world events, she presents serious topics in her distinct style, discussing everything from the Japanese nuclear meltdown, local homelessness, to the economy.  The work was then tweeted, resulting in this body of work being recognized and published in various sources.  A couple have already sold today, which is always great during studio tours.  However, she is not here.  Since I have already gone through the artist list, I know she will be at her studio at Box 13.  It is great to be able to view artists’ work through several different series, especially when it continues to evolve into new concepts. Walking into the studio of Katie Wynne, it is filled with assemblage type sculptures.Katie Wynne, Untitled (Satin)  Random items put together,  initially, I’m not sure what to make of them.  Then I see this beautiful piece of satin on the ground.  It is slowly moving, very sensually, into itself.  It is so simple, composed of two items, the satin and a motor in the middle creating the movement.  She has a fantastic video of Untitled (Satin) on her website.  I also find a massager with knitted covers over the moving parts.  Again, creating a mesmerizing movement that draws me in.  Both of these pieces are composed of a tactile element using a specific type of material and movement.  Meeting Wynne, I discover these more sensual pieces are relatively new, compared to her other works.  I discuss Seven Minutes in Heaven (SMIH) with her, these two particular pieces would fit well in the rooms of the Fox Motel.  She seems interested and I get her business card.  I would love to have her in the show. John RunnelsThis is the second year in a row I have been to the studio of John Runnels and he is not there.  His vulgar work using the word fuck in various media is very amusing.  Creating these works with materials such as dictionaries, letterman jacket letters, money, and other assorted items, I like the variation in media used.  He has another series of work on display as well, vintage looking nude photos that are displayed in oven doors.  I prefer the Fuck Series much more.  Literal and in your face, I think that is what I enjoy about these pieces.  I would really like to talk to him about SMIH, I knew that as soon as I saw his work last year.  Apparently, he is part of the duo that started the Houston Artcrawl.  I’m sure he must be very busy.  Unfortunately, I can find no business cards either.  Well, I know where to find him. Clint Stone is another elusive artist I have yet to meet.  His landscapes have this moody atmosphere that attract me, revealing another reality, a more emotive view of what is there.  Finding artists that create something deeper than what is on Clint Stonethe surface is always the goal.  When I am trying to create a show, my focus is to present art that is not homogeneous.  Maybe I am specifically taking on this challenge by curating shows that have strong connotations already associated with them.  Currently, the group exhibitions I have been trying to put together include landscape, portraiture, and women and fabric.  Those are very traditional topics that I hope to change expectations of.  Ana Fernandez is another artist I would love to include in the landscape exhibit.  I have written about her large scale oil paintings of homes reflecting the culture of San Antonio, when she exhibited in Austin, at Women and Their Work and also when she gave a lecture of her work in San Antonio, at the McNay Art Museum. Ken FrederickThe photography of Ken Frederick also catches my attention.  His portraits of  mannequins are done in a way that gives these lifeless bodies a persona.  Staring at the pieces, I feel like it is a portrait of an actual person.  Unfortunately, it is a little difficult to get a good photo, the frames are highly reflective.  But I think even in this photo there is a sense of emotion.  I get to speak with the artist for a little bit about this, discussing how much life I get from these images.  This definitely works into my theme of untraditional portraiture.  Finding artists with a unique perspective on such a traditional style with a rich history is going to take a while, but will be worth the effort. Kelly AlisonBox 13 is a gallery that also houses studios.  I’ve never made it out here before, so I’m glad I was able to check it out.  This is where Kelly Alison has her studio.  It is great to talk to her.  She shows me her current work, says she would love to show in San Antonio and would be happy to work with me again.  That is always the highest compliment – when someone will return to work with you.  She is an accomplished artist, exhibiting as far as in China and Peru, as well as extensively in Houston, including two permanent public art pieces.  Unfortunately, I am not working specifically on anything that her work would fit into, but I am always coming up with new shows, so I make sure I have her updated contact information.  Alison was in the first show I ever worked on as curator with out of town artists.  It would be great to work with her again.  Maybe I can work on getting her a solo show in San Antonio. Another artist I meet at Box 13 is Elaine Bradford.  Her studio is brimming with transformed taxidermied animals that vary in size from birds and Elaine Bradfordducks to sheep.   Bradford gives them new perspective, with a crocheted skin around the figures, creating a colorful outer layer.  Completely concealing the original figure, the only revealed parts are the eyes of the animal.  Bradford even constructs her own species of animals, complete with their own legends.  There is a great description of these on her website, from her exhibit The Museum of Unnatural History.  This includes a two headed sheep and another species that fuse their tales in a mating ritual when they have found their partner with the same pattern.  While presenting those animals in a traditional setting of taxidermy, as you can see in this photo, other animals are exhibited in new and unusual ways, continuing to surprise in the display, as well as what constitutes as an “animal”, as she merges natural elements with the figures.  Women and fabric?  Maybe another artist that pushes the boundaries and expectations of a traditional medium that I could work with in the future. I have to admit I am pleasantly surprised with the variation of media I found being presented in this Artcrawl.  While I found traditional media such as painting, drawing, sculpture, and photography being used, that was the extend of what was predictable.  Their concepts pushed the media and what it means.  Assemblage and crochet were additional methods I saw used to convey their ideas in interesting and engaging ways.  This was a great studio tour.  If I can find one artist to work with, I consider that a successful studio tour.  But I may have found quite a number of different artists for several different projects.  These are the things I get really excited about.

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