Continuously surrounded by art, I write about my experiences and their influences on my artistic practices. I am a starving artist that spends every minute I can being exposed to as many types of art as possible.

Invisible Gallery: Art Representation

It’s been a couple of weeks since I returned from my trip.  The last few months have been a whirlwind but that has now become a calm lull.  For the first time in a while, my immediate projects and concerns were completed.  There will always be my long-term art projects to work on, but for now, there is no immediacy, no impending due date hanging over my head.  Also swirling in my head was all the new information I had to process from the trip.  There was so much art, so many experiences, what do I do with it all now?  Not to mention I didn’t really have much work lined up.   I needed a few days before I could even begin to think, it was too much.  It turned out, I needed two full weeks of decompressing to bring me back to my normal, take charge personality.

After I reconnected, I am able to see more clearly and not feel so stressed when I look.  Since I don’t have a stable employer, this is all my initiative, and I get to choose what direction I head.  While I am certainly capable of this and is how I normally run my career, this is also why I couldn’t necessarily jump right back in.  It takes a lot of energy, organization, and networking to work with lots of artists, different galleries, and find work for myself.

The first major project I decided to focus on was Invisible Gallery.  During these last two weeks, I got a not so happy call from my partner about our studio and gallery space that we were getting ready to move into – she lost the space.  It was a fantastic three bedroom apartment that was the entire first floor of a two-story house in Tobin Hills.  She had been living there and was ready to move on, but still loved the space for a studio and I entirely agreed.  I was to have control of the large living room for a gallery space.  When she originally called with the bad news, all I could really say was ok.  I was stressed, broke, and in a weird, unfocused place.  I wasn’t in a position to take charge at that moment.  However, once the fog cleared, I realized it was completely salvageable.   But I can’t dwell on that now, I have to spend my time looking for a new space, not lamenting the lost one.

But Invisible Gallery has never been a physical space to date.  It has been my art representation company.  Although, in the beginning, I did have a space for a few months.  Taking advantage of a vacant house close to where I live, I decided to squat, not letting it go to waste.  For six months I had a  rent fee studio space that I shared with Linda Arredondo.  Unfortunately I was not able to keep that space and I had always agreed with myself that I would willingly move out, when eviction time came.

While I have dreams of running my own gallery space, I still sell art now.  I decided I needed to contact the artists I am working with and get things started there.  I am primarily concerned with trying to sell work from their existing inventory, not getting a new body of work at this time.

Linda Arredondo
Zombie Girl, 2011

Linda Arredondo is how and why Invisible Gallery began.  Her work has always been widely admired and respected.  She uses a wide array of media and is very experimental with techniques, making her work intriguing and original.  However, Arredondo is a typical artist, more concerned with working in the studio than spending her time meeting people to sell her art.  While I highly respect her drive, she was being overlooked simply because her work was not getting out there.  I decided I had to do something about that, her work is so amazing.  It all began with a facebook post.  I simply put I had three pieces from Arredondo for sale.  With no images, prices, or descriptions, I sold two pieces within an hour.  The realization that I have been building a network of people that will listen for a moment is invaluable.  They are interested in art.  Arredondo and I have worked together on a few projects, the biggest by far was as co-curator for Seven Minutes in Heaven.  I love promoting Arredondo’s work because it is informed and interesting at the same time.  We often joke about managing each others careers.  She is always giving me fantastic advice on my career, and I work with her on hers.  Arredondo received a Bachelor’s of Fine Art from the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2008, as well as a Master’s of Fine Art from Yale in 2010, and continues to exhibit her work.

John Cody Williams
Our Strange Affairs, 2012

Artist number two was John Cody Williams.  We had previously discussed my selling his work, but I had never received any images, a key component needed for sales.  He often works on mylar or paper, creating delicate, yet often taboo imagery.  When I get to talk with him, he is still interested in my representation.  Things are going good so far.  I have worked with Williams several times before.  We have both been in at least one group show together at JusticeWorks.  He has also been an artist in two shows I have curated, Experimenting Sound, 2009 and Seven Minutes in Heaven, 2012.  Williams work is dreamy and poetic as he visually draws us into often very private moments, sometimes awkward and uncomfortable, yet inviting you to stay at the same time.  His beautifully detailed drawings often take the viewer into a place where everything else is forgotten and are surrounded in Williams’ world, a place where the landscape is ever changing.  Williams attended the University of Houston, receiving a degree in Studio Art in 2008, exhibiting his work and having several article about his work published.

Vanessa A. Garcia
Rampant, 2010

Vanessa A. Garcia is another artist that I am now representing.  She had approached me several months ago about representation.  She previously had trouble dealing with a local organization that had her work and needed some help.  Living in Boerne, tx, which is about 30 minutes outside of San Antonio, it can be difficult for her to always come into town for shows and to meet people.  Unfettered by color, all the nuances in her work are the primary focus.  Using canvas and muslin, the pieces transform into delicate objects revealing vulnerability and femininity. The daughter of a tailor and seamstress, her work incorporates fabrics with strong elements of sewing.  Garcia received her Bachelor’s of Fine Art from the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2007, and has been exhibiting her work since.

Barbara Justice
Pool Study #4, 2009

Another artist I am now working with is Barbara Justice.  Her architectural photography is often haunting.  She takes an inanimate structure, such as a building, and captures the essence, often a feeling of desolation.  The loneliness comes through in each  image, a single captured moment, finding once “alive” locations, that are now seemingly hidden and forgotten.  Justice’s photography is quiet yet powerful,  something I respect about her work.  I have a long standing relationship with Justice, and have always respected her tenacity, starting  JusticeWorks Gallery as a student and running it successfully for almost five years, only closing her doors to make a move to New Mexico, wanting a new start.  I am excited to see her new body of work with all the fresh inspiration.  In 2009, Justice completed her Bachelor’s of Fine Art in Photography from the University of Texas at San Antonio.  She has had her work published in Photographers Forum and continues to work commercially.

Adriana Barrios
Florence Study No. 1, 2010

The fifth and final artist I am representing is Adriana Barrios.  As a print maker, Barrios is concerned with techniques and details.  While smaller in scale, her work is thoughtful and precise.  She had previously discussed with me about representing her work.  I liked her business approach, asking me what I could do for her.  As the other half of JusticeWorks, she also made the move to New Mexico, and was still interested in showing and selling her work in San Antonio also.  However, nothing had ever been solidified, so I took the initiative to contact her, asking if she wanted to be the final artist I represent.  Confirming we are now working together, I am very satisfied with the Invisible Gallery group that has been established.  Barrios completed her Bachelor’s of Fine Art in Printmaking from the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2009, continuing her studies in Florence, Italy.

I personally find the work of these five artists compelling and intelligent.  Building relationships with all five of them since college, I respect their work and understand how dedicated they are to their own ideas.  The diversity of the artists is also something that interests me about this group.  As a curator, I love walking into a show with an idea expressed in various media.  That is a primary goal I focus on when putting together a group of artists.

Five artists is all I can really handle at this time.  With the exception of my initial approach to Linda Arredondo, the other artists all sought me out for representation.  I appreciate that they want to work with me and respect what I am trying to accomplish.  This is an endeavor I have been slowly working on now for a couple of years that has continued momentum.  It is also something I never had particularly envisioned myself doing.  Running a gallery, yes.  Representing artists with no physical space, well, that never even crossed my mind.  But being self employed, I have learned to search for opportunities wherever they may be.  I suppose creating my own opportunities.  Thinking outside the box has lead me down a very interesting journey.  Once you can accept there are constant unknown factors, it is actually exciting to challenge yourself with new ideas.  That is why I love being an artist.

So now my focus is to get imagery and info from all of the artists.  I am trying to be active on the Invisible Gallery facebook page again.

http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Invisible-Gallery/236813276339698?fref=ts

I am also about to begin creating a website.  No, I have never created a website before.  But I have gotten a lot of great advice and info from people that have.  I will never let the fact that I have never done something before stop me from trying.  Will I see any type of immediate payment for my effort?  No.  However that doesn’t change how this new endeavor is very exciting for me.  I am hopeful it will present new opportunities for me.  Most importantly, for myself, I couldn’t be happier doing what I am working on or that I am working with some fantastic artists.  That’s the bottom line for me.

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